Serum and tissue cage fluid concentrations of ciprofloxacin after oral administration of the drug to healthy dogs

Robert D. Walker From the Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory (Walker, MacDonald) and Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Hauptman, Rosser), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Medicine, College of Medicine (Stein), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, and the Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Budsberg).

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Gary E. Stein From the Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory (Walker, MacDonald) and Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Hauptman, Rosser), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Medicine, College of Medicine (Stein), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, and the Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Budsberg).

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Joseph G. Hauptman From the Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory (Walker, MacDonald) and Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Hauptman, Rosser), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Medicine, College of Medicine (Stein), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, and the Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Budsberg).

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Kathleen H. MacDonald From the Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory (Walker, MacDonald) and Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Hauptman, Rosser), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Medicine, College of Medicine (Stein), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, and the Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Budsberg).

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Steven C. Budsberg From the Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory (Walker, MacDonald) and Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Hauptman, Rosser), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Medicine, College of Medicine (Stein), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, and the Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Budsberg).

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Edward J. Rosser Jr. From the Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory (Walker, MacDonald) and Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Hauptman, Rosser), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Medicine, College of Medicine (Stein), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, and the Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Budsberg).

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Summary

Ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent, was administered orally to 4 healthy dogs at dosage of approximately 11 and 23 mg/kg of body weight, every 12 hours for 4 days, with a 4-week interval between dosing regimens. Serum and tissue cage fluid (tcf) concentrations of ciprofloxacin were measured after the first and seventh dose of each dosing regimen. The peak concentration was greatest in the serum after multiple doses of 23 mg/kg (mean ± sem; 5.68 ± 0.54 μg/ml) and least in the tcf after a single dose of 11 mg/kg (0.43 ± 0.54 μg/ml). The time to peak concentration was not influenced by multiple dosing or drug dose, but was longer for tcf (6.41 ± 0.52 hour) than for serum (1.53 ± 0.52 hour). Accumulation of ciprofloxacin was reflected by the area under the concentration curve from 0 to 12 hours after administration (AUC0→12). The AUC0→12 was greatest in the serum after multiple doses of 23 mg/kg (31.95 ± 1.90 μg·h/ml) and least in the tcf after a single dose of 11 mg/kg (3.87 ± 1.90 μg·h/ml). The elimination half-life was not influenced by multiple dosing or dose concentration, but was greater for tcf (14.59 ± 1.91 hours) than for serum (5.14 ± 1.91 hours). The percentage of tcf penetration (AUCTCF/AUCserum ) was greater after multiple doses (95.76 ± 6.79%) than after a single dose (55.55 ± 6.79%) and was not different between doses of 11 and 23 mg/kg. Both dosing regimens of ciprofloxacin resulted in continuous serum and tcf concentrations > 90% of the minimal inhibitory concentration for the aerobic and facultative anaerobic clinical isolates tested, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Summary

Ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent, was administered orally to 4 healthy dogs at dosage of approximately 11 and 23 mg/kg of body weight, every 12 hours for 4 days, with a 4-week interval between dosing regimens. Serum and tissue cage fluid (tcf) concentrations of ciprofloxacin were measured after the first and seventh dose of each dosing regimen. The peak concentration was greatest in the serum after multiple doses of 23 mg/kg (mean ± sem; 5.68 ± 0.54 μg/ml) and least in the tcf after a single dose of 11 mg/kg (0.43 ± 0.54 μg/ml). The time to peak concentration was not influenced by multiple dosing or drug dose, but was longer for tcf (6.41 ± 0.52 hour) than for serum (1.53 ± 0.52 hour). Accumulation of ciprofloxacin was reflected by the area under the concentration curve from 0 to 12 hours after administration (AUC0→12). The AUC0→12 was greatest in the serum after multiple doses of 23 mg/kg (31.95 ± 1.90 μg·h/ml) and least in the tcf after a single dose of 11 mg/kg (3.87 ± 1.90 μg·h/ml). The elimination half-life was not influenced by multiple dosing or dose concentration, but was greater for tcf (14.59 ± 1.91 hours) than for serum (5.14 ± 1.91 hours). The percentage of tcf penetration (AUCTCF/AUCserum ) was greater after multiple doses (95.76 ± 6.79%) than after a single dose (55.55 ± 6.79%) and was not different between doses of 11 and 23 mg/kg. Both dosing regimens of ciprofloxacin resulted in continuous serum and tcf concentrations > 90% of the minimal inhibitory concentration for the aerobic and facultative anaerobic clinical isolates tested, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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