Identification and anatomic categorization of the vascular patterns to the pelvic limb muscles of dogs

Jonathan N. Chambers From the Departments of Small Animal Medicine (Chambers, Allen, Moore) and Anatomy and Radiology (Purinton), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Search for other papers by Jonathan N. Chambers in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Paul T. Purinton From the Departments of Small Animal Medicine (Chambers, Allen, Moore) and Anatomy and Radiology (Purinton), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Search for other papers by Paul T. Purinton in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Sheila W. Allen From the Departments of Small Animal Medicine (Chambers, Allen, Moore) and Anatomy and Radiology (Purinton), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Search for other papers by Sheila W. Allen in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
James L. Moore From the Departments of Small Animal Medicine (Chambers, Allen, Moore) and Anatomy and Radiology (Purinton), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Search for other papers by James L. Moore in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MD

SUMMARY

The vascular patterns to pelvic limb muscles were studied in 6 dogs (12 limbs) to identify muscles most suitable for transposition in the treatment of large wounds. Gross dissection of injected specimens and angiography were used to identify the vascular pedicles. The vascular peicles to several muscles were generally consistent, and any variations would not interfere with most muscle transfers. The cranial part of the sartorius, gracillis, semitendinosus, and rectus femoris muscles were identified as suitable candidates for transfer. The caudal part of the sartorius, cranial tibial, and long digital extensor muscles have segmentalized vascular patterns that would limit its arc of rotation.

SUMMARY

The vascular patterns to pelvic limb muscles were studied in 6 dogs (12 limbs) to identify muscles most suitable for transposition in the treatment of large wounds. Gross dissection of injected specimens and angiography were used to identify the vascular pedicles. The vascular peicles to several muscles were generally consistent, and any variations would not interfere with most muscle transfers. The cranial part of the sartorius, gracillis, semitendinosus, and rectus femoris muscles were identified as suitable candidates for transfer. The caudal part of the sartorius, cranial tibial, and long digital extensor muscles have segmentalized vascular patterns that would limit its arc of rotation.

Advertisement