Effects of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Actinobacillus (Haemophilus) pleuropneumoniae infections on alveolar macrophage functions in swine

J. P. Caruso From the Veterinary Medical Research Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA. 50011.

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R. F. Ross From the Veterinary Medical Research Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA. 50011.

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SUMMARY

Alveolar macrophages were collected at necropsy from pigs inoculated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae or Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae or both and were tested for phagocytic capabilities, using in vitro techniques. Macrophages from noninoculated littermates were used as controls. Alveolar macrophages from pigs inoculated with either M hyopneumoniae or A pleuropneumoniae had significantly (P < 0.05 to P < 0.0025) higher phagocytic capacity than that of noninoculated controls. Macrophages from A pleuropneumoniae-inoculated pigs were comparatively more stimulated than were those from M hyopneumoniae-inoculated pigs. Pigs inoculated with M hyopneumoniae and then challenge-exposed with A pleuropneumoniae 2 and 4 weeks later had greatly reduced phagocytosis. Infection with M hyopneumoniae or A pleuropneumoniae caused stimulation of alveolar macrophage functions, and M hyopneumoniae infections may have suppressed phagocytic responses when pigs were challenge-exposed with a secondary pathogen (A pleuropneumoniae). This potential suppression may represent a prediposition of the host by M hyopneumoniae to secondary bacterial infections.

SUMMARY

Alveolar macrophages were collected at necropsy from pigs inoculated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae or Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae or both and were tested for phagocytic capabilities, using in vitro techniques. Macrophages from noninoculated littermates were used as controls. Alveolar macrophages from pigs inoculated with either M hyopneumoniae or A pleuropneumoniae had significantly (P < 0.05 to P < 0.0025) higher phagocytic capacity than that of noninoculated controls. Macrophages from A pleuropneumoniae-inoculated pigs were comparatively more stimulated than were those from M hyopneumoniae-inoculated pigs. Pigs inoculated with M hyopneumoniae and then challenge-exposed with A pleuropneumoniae 2 and 4 weeks later had greatly reduced phagocytosis. Infection with M hyopneumoniae or A pleuropneumoniae caused stimulation of alveolar macrophage functions, and M hyopneumoniae infections may have suppressed phagocytic responses when pigs were challenge-exposed with a secondary pathogen (A pleuropneumoniae). This potential suppression may represent a prediposition of the host by M hyopneumoniae to secondary bacterial infections.

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