Plasma glucocorticoid concentrations in calves as an indicator of stress during parturition

C. Hoyer From the Klinik für Geburtshilfe und Gynakologie des Rindes im Richard-Götze-Haus der Tierärztlichen Hochschule, D-3000 Hannover, Federal Republic of Germany (Hoyer, Grunert) and Wolfgang Jöchle Assoc Inc, Denville, NJ 07834 (Jöchle).

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E. Grunert From the Klinik für Geburtshilfe und Gynakologie des Rindes im Richard-Götze-Haus der Tierärztlichen Hochschule, D-3000 Hannover, Federal Republic of Germany (Hoyer, Grunert) and Wolfgang Jöchle Assoc Inc, Denville, NJ 07834 (Jöchle).

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W. Jöchle From the Klinik für Geburtshilfe und Gynakologie des Rindes im Richard-Götze-Haus der Tierärztlichen Hochschule, D-3000 Hannover, Federal Republic of Germany (Hoyer, Grunert) and Wolfgang Jöchle Assoc Inc, Denville, NJ 07834 (Jöchle).

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SUMMARY

Plasma glucocorticoid concentrations and blood gas values were determined for 6 days in 47 newborn calves that had been subjected to various obstetrical procedures at term. Concentrations of glucocorticoids were uniformly high at birth (70 to 103 ng/ml). Increasing degrees of acidosis were accompanied by increasing glucocorticoid concentrations in plasma. Plasma glucocorticoid concentrations decreased sharply during the first 6 hours after delivery and reached a plateau at 48 hours after birth (14 to 21 ng/ml). The latter was taken as an indication that adaptation had been achieved. Calves subjected to severe pulling had higher glucocorticoid concentrations at birth (110.4 ng/ml) than calves requiring no assistance (88.3 ng/ml), calves requiring only slight assistance (83.8 ng/ml), or calves that had been delivered by cesarean section (82.9 ng/ml).

SUMMARY

Plasma glucocorticoid concentrations and blood gas values were determined for 6 days in 47 newborn calves that had been subjected to various obstetrical procedures at term. Concentrations of glucocorticoids were uniformly high at birth (70 to 103 ng/ml). Increasing degrees of acidosis were accompanied by increasing glucocorticoid concentrations in plasma. Plasma glucocorticoid concentrations decreased sharply during the first 6 hours after delivery and reached a plateau at 48 hours after birth (14 to 21 ng/ml). The latter was taken as an indication that adaptation had been achieved. Calves subjected to severe pulling had higher glucocorticoid concentrations at birth (110.4 ng/ml) than calves requiring no assistance (88.3 ng/ml), calves requiring only slight assistance (83.8 ng/ml), or calves that had been delivered by cesarean section (82.9 ng/ml).

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