Disassociation of bactericidal and fungistatic activities from the oxidative burst of avian macrophages

Barry G. Harmon From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology and Avian Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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John R. Glisson From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology and Avian Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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SUMMARY

Avian peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to phagocytic stimuli, produced an appreciable oxidative burst as measured by production of chemiluminescence, superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide. Metabolic inhibitors of the oxidative burst and scavengers of oxygen radicals clearly inhibited macrophage chemiluminescence, but had no significant effect on macrophage bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli or fungistatic activity against Candida tropicalis. Therefore, avian macrophages were capable ofox ygen-independent bactericidal and fungistatic activities.

SUMMARY

Avian peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to phagocytic stimuli, produced an appreciable oxidative burst as measured by production of chemiluminescence, superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide. Metabolic inhibitors of the oxidative burst and scavengers of oxygen radicals clearly inhibited macrophage chemiluminescence, but had no significant effect on macrophage bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli or fungistatic activity against Candida tropicalis. Therefore, avian macrophages were capable ofox ygen-independent bactericidal and fungistatic activities.

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