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Medical infrared thermal imaging, also known as thermal imaging or thermography, is a valuable noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique increasingly used in clinical practice. Medical infrared thermal imaging involves the recording of cutaneous

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

bull was first restrained in a closed stall and allowed approximately 30 minutes to acclimate to ambient temperature. Global thermal images were initially obtained at a focal distance of 3 m from the anterior, posterior, left, and right perspectives

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Thermography is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique that involves the recording of cutaneous thermal patterns generated by the emission of surface heat; the patterns are reported in the form of a color map. Surface heat measured from the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Thermal energy is used in > 100,000 procedures annually to treat partial-thickness injuries to cartilage. a Although temperature- and power-controlled devices are available for chondroplasty procedures, the clinical effect is the result of heat

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

thermography include a lack of sensitivity to deep lesions and chronic processes as well as a lack of specificity. 8 Visual thermal images are generated with an infrared camera and computerized data manipulation. All objects with temperatures greater than

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

.4]) + 46.4. Study procedures Profile digital thermal images b of individual calves were obtained from immediately outside each pen via convenience sampling during the 6 am and 3 pm hours for 10 days over a 14-day period. The time for the afternoon

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

organ-sparing technique for the treatment of liver, kidney, lung, and bone tumors in human patients and can be performed through open surgery, minimally invasive surgery, or image-guided percutaneous methods. 10 Several modalities of thermal ablation

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To compare the infrared thermographic appearance of bovine ears that had received contaminated growth promotant implants with ears that had received clean implants and ears without implants.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

32 yearling crossbred beef steers with a mean weight of 322 kg (708 lbs).

Procedure

Contaminated (n = 16) and clean (16) implants were placed in the ears of feedlot cattle. Nonimplanted (n = 32) ears served as a within-animal control for thermographic comparisons. Images of rostral and caudal surfaces were obtained during a 21-day period, using an infrared thermal imaging radiometer. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine the relationship between mean temperature in a zone on the rostral surface of the ear and at 3 locations (proximal, middle, distal) on the caudal surface of the ear (response variables) with treatment (ears with contaminated implants or clean implants vs control ears with no implants), time (repeated day of measurement), and interactions among these variables.

Results

Significant temperature differences existed between ears with contaminated implants and control ears. Temperatures for ears with clean implants were significantly higher than control ears on day 2. At low ambient temperatures when the ears became wet, a greater temperature contrast was detected between ears with contaminated implants and control ears.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Thermal imaging of the ears of feedlot cattle is a noninvasive diagnostic tool that can be used to identify cattle with abscesses caused by contaminated growth-promotant implants. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1320–1324)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

carrageenan administration as well. Thermal stimulus withdrawal testing took place the day following treatments, with measurements being taken at time “0” (baseline; 24 hours posttreatment), 24.5, 25.5, 27, and 30 hours posttreatment. Imaging of footpads

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

and reach a higher temperature is longer than that required by the surrounding soft tissues. The interval required for the P3 to thaw and warm may be even longer, considering that the horny hoof acts as thermal insulation. Magnetic resonance imaging

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research