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on self-efficacy, or the belief in one’s ability to perform specific behaviors relative to specific performance outcomes. 10 Possessing knowledge and skills related to performing a task is important, but some degree of self-efficacy, or the belief

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Self-efficacy is defined as an individual’s level of confidence to exert control over their own behavior and, in the context of research skills, is often measured to understand what factors influence how trainees perceive their

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

motivated to pursue an academic career, postgraduate veterinarians would likely need confidence and belief in their ability to succeed in such tasks. This is the concept of self-efficacy, which was formally described by Bandura 12 in 1977 as a personal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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Introduction An integral component of the Sydney School of Veterinary Science’s revised postgraduate curricular design is the incorporation of student-centered learning activities that foster the development of learner self-efficacy. An

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

maintained at follow-up. With efficacy of the program demonstrated in a controlled trial, next steps must begin to target effectiveness in the field. To broadly disseminate the program, it is important to understand whetehr an asynchronous or self

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

concepts known as constructs) are assumed to influence health-related behavior. 27 Constructs of the HBM include perceived susceptibility and severity, benefits and barriers, and self-efficacy and cues to action. The overall premise of the HBM is that

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

multiple drugs used in veterinary medicine to activate many of these receptors and each come with their own efficacy and side effects. Apomorphine is one of the most common emetics used. It is a nonselective dopamine receptor agonist 4 which stimulates

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To assess the efficacy of clomipramine for treatment of canine compulsive disorder (CCD).

Design

Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced AB-BA crossover clinical study

Animals

51 dogs with CCD.

Procedures

Dogs were given clomipramine (3 mg/kg [1.3 mg/lb] of body weight, PO, q 12 h) for 4 weeks and placebo for 4 weeks. At the end of each treatment each owner rated the severity of their dog's behavior, using 2 validated rating scales. Statistical analysis was made by ordinal regression. Compliance, adverse effects, and the effectiveness of masking were also assessed. Each dog's behavior was reevaluated 1 to 2 years after completing the study.

Results

Behaviors included spinning (n = 17) and self-mutilation by licking (acral lick dermatitis, 12). Both rating scales demonstrated a treatment effect. Compliance was satisfactory, and masking was effective. Sedation and reduced appetite were reported more commonly when dogs were given clomipramine than when they were given placebo. Forty-five dogs available for follow-up evaluation still had their behaviors; 6 dogs were lost to follow-up evaluation.

Clinical Implications

Results suggest that clomipramine was effective in dogs with CCD and was not associated with serious adverse effects. However, treatment for 4 weeks was not curative. Behavior modification is likely to be necessary to manage CCD. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:1760–1766)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the ability of lufenuron to control cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis felis) populations on dogs under conditions simulating a naturally infested home environment.

Design

2 treatment and 2 control groups of dogs. Treated dogs received lufenuron in tablet form monthly, and controls received excipient. Dogs had unrestricted access to indoor (carpeted) and outdoor (grassy) environments in which self-propagating flea populations had been established.

Animals

17 adult female Beagles.

Procedure

Dogs were monitored for 77 days after initial infestation with fleas and 70 days after initial treatment. Efficacy of the drug was calculated on the basis of absolute reduction in flea counts and as a percentage of control.

Results

Lufenuron administration caused a statistically significant (P < 0.05) reduction in flea burdens in treated dogs, compared with controls. Initiation of treatment 7 days after infestation resulted in 75% control of F1-generation and 97% control of F2-generation fleas over a 70-day posttreatment period.

Conclusions

Lufenuron was highly effective in reducing flea populations on dogs. The time required for control will vary with the duration (generation time) of the flea reproductive cycle and, hence, the geographic area in which the product will be used. The experimental results are most relevant to use of the product for control of an existing flea population in the Midwest. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:502–504)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

learning activities that increase student engagement and skills-learning self-efficacy, including an introduction to surgical theory that governs competent skill performance, an online resource that contains a demonstration video of a benchmark skill

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association