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nonpainful rostral mandibular swelling. The referring veterinarian saw the patient 2 weeks prior for a progressively growing lesion affecting the rostral mandible and halitosis. The physical examination revealed signs of periodontal disease, such as

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mandible and osteolucency around both mandibular incisor roots. The area over the swelling was aseptically prepared, and the abscess was lanced, expelling fetid, thick, purulent material. Samples were submitted for cytologic examination and microbial

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

musculature but higher than the retrobulbar fat. Case 3 A 22-year-old Standardbred gelding was referred with slightly painful and hard swelling of 15 X 5 X 5 cm (LWH) at the interdental diastema of the right mandible. On this side, the mandibular

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

chains as well as foreign bodies, neoplasia, dirofilariasis, sialoadenitis, and sialolithiasis. 7 – 12 Sublingual and mandibular sialoceles typically present as a nonpainful fluctuant mass in the intermandibular, cranioventral cervical, sublingual, or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Odontogenic cysts are mandibular or maxillary cavitations lined with odontogenic epithelium. Identification and classification of specific odontogenic cysts in animals are improving, particularly in dogs and largely because of increasing

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Disorders of the salivary glands are considered rare in dogs and cats, with a reported overall incidence of < 0.3%. 1 In dogs, recognized diseases affecting the major salivary glands (parotid, mandibular, sublingual, and zygomatic) include

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine typical clinical and radiographic findings in a group of New World camelids with tooth root abscesses and to determine outcome after medical and surgical treatment.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

23 llamas and alpacas with radiographic and clinical evidence of tooth root abscesses.

Procedure

Disease history, signalment, physical and radiographic examination findings, bacteriologic culture results, treatment, and short-term and long-term outcome were retrieved from the medical records.

Results

Local swelling was the most common clinical abnormality in camelids with tooth root abscesses. Mandibular molars were affected most commonly, and bacteriologic culture of samples from lesions often revealed facultative anaerobic bacteria. Antibiotic treatment for at least 30 days, surgical extraction of the affected tooth, and a root canal procedure were used successfully to treat tooth root abscesses.

Clinical Implications

Both surgical and medical treatment of tooth root abscesses may lead to successful resolution of clinical signs in New World camelids. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:819–822)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 26-year-old 422-kg Arabian mixed-breed gelding was referred for evaluation of a left mandibular swelling that had progressively grown following extraction of multiple mandibular cheek teeth approximately 5 weeks earlier when the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History and Physical Examination Findings A 6-year-old Swedish Warmblood gelding was evaluated by the referring veterinarian because of right mandibular swelling of 24 hours' duration. The horse was having difficulty eating and was evasive

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

anesthesia revealed a 2.1 × 2.9 × 2.3-mm moderately firm, fluid-filled swelling, and pink to slightly pale purple mucosa along the rostral region of the right mandible from the distal aspect of the right mandibular canine tooth to the mesial aspect of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association