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.8%; Figure 3 ). Radiographic evidence of inflammation was identified for 59 (39.9%) RTRFs. Figure 1— Representative intraoral radiographic images obtained from dogs with RTRFs that were classified as buried (ie, the coronal end of the fragment was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

subgingival swelling with variable severity. 12 – 14 Furthermore, the (eating) behavior may be altered. In addition to these clinical findings, EOTRH diagnosis is based on typical radiographic findings, such as variable levels of dental resorption and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the diagnostic value of 2 intraoral bisecting angle radiographic views in comparison with periodontal probing for the assessment of periodontal attachment of the canine teeth in dogs.

Study Population—466 canine teeth from 117 dogs.

Procedure—Periodontal probing measurements were recorded, and clinical attachment levels (CAL) were calculated at the mesial, buccal, distal, and lingual (or palatal) surfaces on each canine tooth. Occlusal and lateral radiographs of the canine teeth were obtained. Alveolar margin height (AMH) was measured at the same 4 surfaces. Values for AMH and CAL were compared on the basis of tooth surface, dental arch, and radiographic view.

Results—The AMH at the mesial and distal surfaces of the mandibular canine teeth was measurable on the lateral view and was significantly correlated with CAL. Similar results were found for the mesial and distal surfaces of the maxillary canine teeth. Buccal and lingual AMH were measured on the mandibular occlusal radiographic view, and values were significantly correlated with CAL, but only the buccal AMH could be assessed on the occlusal radiographic view of the maxilla with values that correlated significantly with CAL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The lateral radiographic view is suitable for evaluating periodontal attachment at the mesial and distal surfaces of the canine teeth in dogs. The occlusal radiographic view is suitable for assessing buccal surfaces as well as the lingual surface of mandibular canine teeth but not the palatal surface of maxillary canine teeth in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:255–261)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

view of the rostral portion of the skull obtained 1 month prior to examination at the teaching hospital ( Figure 1 ) was submitted for review. In addition, the llama was anesthetized and an intraoral ventrodorsal radiographic view of the rostral portion

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

picks, curettes, chisels, and gouges were used to complete intraoral extraction when required. Postextraction radiography or CT image acquisition were not routinely performed. Statistical analysis Clinical factors and CT findings assessed for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

intraoral radiography was performed to screen for abnormalities or injuries not evident during the oral examination. An intraoral radiographic view of the caudal portion of the left mandible is provided ( Figure 1 ). Figure 1— Lateral intraoral

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

anesthetized were similar. Intraoral radiographic views of the right maxillary and right mandibular canine teeth were obtained and compared with views obtained immediately after root canal treatment to determine the periapical status of both teeth and assess

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

within reference limits, and the patient was anesthetized for radiography of the mass and excisional biopsy. An intraoral radiograph of the mass is shown ( Figure 2 ). Figure 1— Photograph of a cylindrical maxillary mass located between the right

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Figure 2— Intraoral radiographic view of the caudal aspect of the right mandible (including the fourth premolar tooth, first molar tooth, and rostral portion of the second molar tooth) of the same dog as in Figure 1 . The image was obtained with a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the right side of the nasal cavity causing destruction of the nasal turbinates and several adjacent bony structures. Intraoral radiography performed under the same anesthetic episode revealed ill-defined periapical lucencies surrounding the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association