Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 146 items for :

  • highly pathogenic avian influenza x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

. 9 Kaye D Pringle CR . Avian influenza viruses and their implication for human health . Clin Infect Dis 2005 ; 40 : 108 – 112 . 10 OIE (World Organization for Animal Health) Web site . Technical disease cards: highly

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIv) has spread into all continents via movement in both domestic poultry and transmission and movement through wild avian species. 1 Evolving lineages in the last few years have

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

continents. On the other hand, LPAI viruses (H5 and H7 subtypes) can mutate into highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses as a result of insertion mutations in the cleavage site of the HA gene or deletion mutations in the NA gene and cause clinical

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To determine economic losses associated with an outbreak of avian influenza in flocks in Pennsylvania during 1997 and 1998.

Sample Population

5 premises containing avian influenza-infected layer, pullet, and turkey flocks.

Procedure

Losses incurred before depopulation, those incurred at the time of depopulation, and those that were attributable to depopulation (unrealized loss of income) were evaluated. Results were extrapolated to provide values for all infected flocks.

Results

Extrapolating the costs determined on the basis of age and number of birds from the 5 sample flocks to all other flocks infected with nonpathogenic avian influenza H7N2 yielded an estimated total cost to the Pennsylvania poultry industry of $3.5 million.

Clinical Implications

The H7N2 virus is not highly pathogenic. If the pathogenicity of the virus does not change, then the poultry industry and state and federal governments will not have severe economic losses for the 1997–1998 outbreak similar to those for the 1983–1984 avian influenza outbreak in Pennsylvania. To decrease the potential for financial losses that could result from future outbreaks of avian influenza, it is essential that the commercial industry and live-bird market system be separated via increased use of biosecurity measures. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:1164–1167)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Recent media and news reports and other information implicate wild birds in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Asia and Eastern Europe. Although there is little information concerning highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify risk factors associated with the spread of low pathogenicity H7N2 avian influenza (AI) virus among commercial poultry farms in western Virginia during an outbreak in 2002.

Design—Case-control study.

Procedure—Questionnaires were used to collect information about farm characteristics, biosecurity measures, and husbandry practices on 151 infected premises (128 turkey and 23 chicken farms) and 199 noninfected premises (167 turkey and 32 chicken farms).

Results—The most significant risk factor for AI infection was disposal of dead birds by rendering (odds ratio [OR], 7.3). In addition, age ≥ 10 weeks (OR for birds aged 10 to 19 weeks, 4.9; OR for birds aged ≥ 20 weeks, 4.3) was a significant risk factor regardless of poultry species involved. Other significant risk factors included use of nonfamily caretakers and the presence of mammalian wildlife on the farm. Factors that were not significantly associated with infection included use of various routine biosecurity measures, food and litter sources, types of domestic animals on the premises, and presence of wild birds on the premises.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that an important factor contributing to rapid early spread of AI virus infection among commercial poultry farms during this outbreak was disposal of dead birds via rendering off-farm. Because of the highly infectious nature of AI virus and the devastating economic impact of outbreaks, poultry farmers should consider carcass disposal techniques that do not require offfarm movement, such as burial, composting, or incineration. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:767–772)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

influenza A(H10N7) virus in a harbor seal, British Columbia, Canada . Emerg Infect Dis . 2022 ; 28 ( 7 ): 1480 - 1484 . doi: 10.3201/eid2807.212302 8. USDA APHIS . 2022-2024 detections of highly pathogenic avian influenza in mammals . Accessed January

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. The Mexican authorities were able to eliminate the highly pathogenic avian influenza by use of vaccination and depopulation, but the low pathogenic form of the virus was not eradicated and eventually spread to Guatemala and El Salvador. All published

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

ataxia of 1 week's duration 1863 A 5-month-old leopard with left hind limb lameness of 2 weeks' duration 1865 Public Veterinary Medicine: Public Health Review of the highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak in Texas, 2004 1869 Early

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the threat posed by H5N1 HPAI virus, a National Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Response Plan was developed by the USDA APHIS in cooperation with the nation's poultry industry and other stakeholders. A summary of the plan was initially published in

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association