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neurological examination findings can be used to prioritize the most common differential diagnoses in cats with myelopathies. 3 However, none of these previous studies described central cord syndrome (CCS) in cats. Central cord syndrome is a clinical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Pancreatitis is recognized as a relatively common disorder in cats, causing substantial morbidity and, less commonly, death. 1 – 30 Clinical findings include inappetence, lethargy, vomiting, weight loss, and, less commonly

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Primary brain tumors occur with a reported incidence of 2.2% in cats, and meningioma is the most reported primary brain tumor in cats, 1 – 6 accounting for 56% to 58% of all intracranial tumors. 1 , 7 Cats with meningiomas are

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

population and to prevent diseases associated with reproductive organs. 2 For female dogs and cats, this includes eliminating the risk of uterine cystic hyperplasia associated with a pyometra, 3 unwanted pregnancies, and uterine and ovarian neoplasia 4 and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction In cats, upper motor neuron injury (UMNI) between the pons and L3 induces a deficit of the voluntary contraction of the detrusor muscle of the bladder due to the interruption of the propagation of the afferent signals from the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Solitary pulmonary lesions are occasionally seen in dogs and cats. The main indication for sampling these lesions is to determine whether these nodules are benign or malignant. Establishing the nature of a thoracic lesion is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Noninfectious PIVC complication rates in hospitalized dogs range from 12.1% to 43%, with phlebitis and line breakage being the most commonly reported. 2 , 3 , 9 , 10 Hospitalized cats have reported complication rates between 21.4% and 52%, with disuse or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To provide a video tutorial on how to perform an alternate method for urethral catheterization, the 2-catheter technique.

ANIMALS

Small female cats and dogs that are too small for concurrent digital palpation (generally < 10 kg).

METHODS

A larger red rubber catheter (18 Fr in dogs, and 10 Fr in cats) is gently fed into the vaginal canal and reflected dorsally, then a smaller urethral catheter can be introduced ventrally, angling downwards at a 45° angle, into the urethral orifice for urinary catheterization.

RESULTS

The 2-catheter method is a useful alternative in petite female cats and dogs to improve rates of successful catheterization.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The inability to perform concurrent digital palpation in petite female dogs and cats can make urinary catheterization more challenging due to the inability to palpate locoregional anatomic landmarks and without the added manipulation of the catheter tip during placement. Using a second, larger catheter to occlude the vaginal canal similarly to how a finger would during digital palpation can aid in successful catheterization in this challenging subset of veterinary patients.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A consensus seems to exist that it is desirable to increase the proportion of cats in the United States that are neutered, and a growing number of jurisdictions are enacting legislation in an attempt to effectuate this policy objective. However

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association