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Introduction Urethral catheterization is a common clinical skill performed by veterinary technicians, general practitioners, and specialists alike. While there is a learning curve to successfully placing urethral catheters in female cats and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) placement is a necessity for many hospitalized patients in both veterinary and human hospitals, facilitating the administration of fluids, medications, and crucial medical treatments. 1 , 2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are commonly placed in human and veterinary patients to facilitate the administration of IV fluids and medications. 1 , 2 Although PIVCs play a vital role in the treatment of hospitalized

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To provide a video tutorial on how to perform an alternate method for urethral catheterization, the 2-catheter technique.

ANIMALS

Small female cats and dogs that are too small for concurrent digital palpation (generally < 10 kg).

METHODS

A larger red rubber catheter (18 Fr in dogs, and 10 Fr in cats) is gently fed into the vaginal canal and reflected dorsally, then a smaller urethral catheter can be introduced ventrally, angling downwards at a 45° angle, into the urethral orifice for urinary catheterization.

RESULTS

The 2-catheter method is a useful alternative in petite female cats and dogs to improve rates of successful catheterization.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The inability to perform concurrent digital palpation in petite female dogs and cats can make urinary catheterization more challenging due to the inability to palpate locoregional anatomic landmarks and without the added manipulation of the catheter tip during placement. Using a second, larger catheter to occlude the vaginal canal similarly to how a finger would during digital palpation can aid in successful catheterization in this challenging subset of veterinary patients.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Retrograde catheterization of the urinary bladder is a common, straightforward, and essential procedure in the management of many disorders of the urinary tract in most animal species. The procedure is used to obtain urine samples for analysis

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Urinary catheterization is indicated for various medical conditions in veterinary species. Urinary catheters may increase the risk of bacterial contamination and colonization of the lower urinary tract via contamination of the urine collection

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The Chinese finger trap (or finger trap) suture pattern is commonly used to secure the external portion of various types of tubing and catheters placed in dogs and cats. Common applications for finger trap sutures include enteral feeding catheters

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Indications for urethral catheterization include monitoring and quantification of urine output, collection of a urine sample for analysis, performance of radiographic contrast procedures, relief of an anatomic or functional obstruction, and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

expression, intermittent cystocentesis, intermittent catheterization, or placement of an indwelling urinary catheter. Of concern is whether these practices increase the risk for UTI and, if infection develops, whether these practices are likely to promote

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, implantation of a catheter in the paramedian area can be an important alternative procedure that will enable urinary diversion and allow inflammation around the obstructing urolith in the urethra to subside. 8,11 This technique can be performed percutaneously

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association