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Abstract

Objective—To assess the heritability of pancreatic acinar atrophy (PAA) in German Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) in the United States.

Animals—135 GSDs belonging to 2 multigenerational pedigrees.

Procedure—Two multigenerational pedigrees of GSDs with family members with PAA were identified. The clinical history of each GSD enrolled in the study was recorded, and serum samples for canine trypsinlike immunoreactivity (cTLI) analysis were collected from 102 dogs. Dogs with a serum cTLI concentration ≤ 2.0 µg/L were considered to have exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and were assumed to have PAA.

Results—Pedigree I consisted of 59 dogs and pedigree II of 76 dogs. Serum cTLI concentrations were measured in 48 dogs from pedigree I and 54 dogs from pedigree II. A total of 19 dogs (14.1%) were determined to have EPI, 9 in pedigree I (15.3%) and 10 in pedigree II (13.6%). Of the 19 dogs with EPI, 8 were male and 11 were female.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Evaluation of data by complex segregation analysis is strongly suggestive of an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for EPI in GSDs in the United States. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1429–1434)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

German Shepherd Dogs, Labrador Retrievers, and Boxers. 4 , 5 A variety of radiographic measurements have been utilized in both adult humans and dogs to assess hip dysplasia. 2 , 6 – 9 An extended ventrodorsal (VD) view of the pelvis, first introduced in

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

joints are a site of pain in dogs. German Shepherd Dogs are predisposed to diseases that cause lumbosacral region pain. 13 German Shepherd Dogs are commonly used as working police and military dogs. 14,15 These dogs are socially and economically

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

considerations brought about the study reported here. First, we had recently noticed that during a routine electrophysiologic, closed-thorax study a to determine the ERP of the atria in German Shepherd Dogs, atrial fibrillation frequently and unintentionally was

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

A 5-year-old 34.3-kg (75.5-lb) neutered male German Shepherd Dog was evaluated at the University of Florida Small Animal Hospital because of chronic azotemia. Ten days previously, the referring veterinarian had examined the dog because of polyuria

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Doberman Pinscher and Great Dane, respectively. 6–11 There are few reports 6,8,10–13 of CSM in German Shepherd Dogs, with correspondingly few descriptions of the neurologic and MRI features of the disease in this breed. German Shepherd Dogs are

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. ABBREVIATIONS GSD German Shepherd Dog DLSS Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis a. Fuji AC3-System, Fujifilm AG, Dielsdorf, Switzerland. b. StatView, version 5, SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC. c. SPSS, version 10, SPSS Inc, Chicago, Ill

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 10-month-old 27-kg intact female German Shepherd Dog (GSD) presented to the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine for abdominal CT evaluation of a suspected intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. Recent serum

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Four German Shepherd Dogs from a litter of 10 were evaluated because of postnatal onset of proportionate growth stunting that clinically resembled well-documented hypopituitary dwarfism in that breed. Although 2 pups had histologic evidence of hypopituitarism, the remaining 2 pups had normal serum growth hormone concentration and adrenocorticotropin secretory capability, and normal adrenal function test and thyroid function study results. Furthermore, the initially stunted German Shepherd Dogs grew at a steady rate until at 1 year, body weight and shoulder height approximated normal measurements. Seemingly, delayed growth in these pups may represent one end of a clinical spectrum associated with hypopituitarism in German Shepherd Dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine whether distraction index (DI), a measure of passive hip joint laxity, at 2 months of age was predictive of DI at 4 or 12 months of age in German Shepherd Dogs.

Design

Prospective cohort study.

Animals

45 German Shepherd Dogs.

Procedure

DI was measured at 2, 4, and 12 months of age. At the same times, a standard ventrodorsal radiographic projection of the pelvis with the hip joints extended was obtained and examined for evidence of degenerative joint disease (DJD). To facilitate radiographic positioning, dogs were sedated or anesthetized.

Results

DI at 2 months of age was not significantly correlated with DI at 4 or 12 months of age. However, DI at 4 months of age was correlated with DI at 12 months of age. The proportion of dogs with DI ≥ 0.3 at 12 months of age that had radiographic evidence of DJD by 12 months of age (13/22; 59%) was significantly greater than the proportion of dogs with DI < 0.3 at 12 months of age that had radiographic evidence of DJD by 12 months of age (1/9; 11 %).

Clinical Implications

For German Shepherd Dogs, DI at 2 months of age was not sufficiently reliable to predict DI at 4 and 12 months of age; however, DI at 4 and 12 months of age were comparable. We recommend that, for German Shepherd Dogs, DI not be measured before 4 months of age and that particularly for breeding dogs, DI be remeasured after maturity to confirm DI obtained at earlier ages. Studies including other breeds of dogs should be done to determine the youngest reliable age to initiate hip joint screening. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212:1560–1563)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association