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trotting on a water treadmill at different water depths (WDs): DRY = control condition; WD-CAN = mid-cannon bone; WD-RAD = mid-radius; WD-SHOUL = shoulder point. (a) trotting speed: 3.5 m/s; (b) trotting speed: 5 m/s. The columns represent the median values

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of underwater treadmill exercise on static postural sway in horses with experimentally induced carpal joint osteoarthritis under various stance conditions.

Animals—16 horses.

Procedures—On day 0, osteoarthritis was induced arthroscopically in 1 randomly selected middle carpal joint of each horse. Beginning on day 15, horses were assigned to either underwater or overground (without water) treadmill exercise at the same speed, frequency, and duration. Two serial force platforms were used to collect postural sway data from each horse on study days −7, 14, 42, and 70. Horses were made to stand stationary on the force platforms under 3 stance conditions: normal square stance, base-narrow placement of the thoracic limbs, and removal of visual cues (blindfolded) during a normal square stance. The mean of 3 consecutive, 10-second trials in each condition was calculated and used for analysis.

Results—Displacement of the center of pressure differed significantly depending on the stance condition. Among horses exercised on the underwater treadmill, postural stability in both the base-narrow and blindfolded stance conditions improved, compared with findings for horses exercised on the overground treadmill. Horses exercised on the overground treadmill were only successful at maintaining a stable center of pressure during the normal square stance position.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Variations in stance position had profound effects on the mechanics of standing balance in horses with experimentally induced carpal joint osteoarthritis. Underwater treadmill exercise significantly improved the horses’ postural stability, which is fundamental in providing evidence-based support for equine aquatic exercise.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

History A 5-year-old 600-kg German Warmblood mare was presented with lameness in the left hind limb and swelling of the left stifle joint. Two months earlier, the mare had jumped out of a water treadmill and sustained several injuries on both

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

weeks of water or conventional treadmill training did not result in a cardiocirculatory or metabolic training response in SDF or gluteal muscles; therefore, a gradual introduction of speed training is likely necessary after water treadmill rehabilitation

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

horses included in this study had previous experience with exercise on a standard treadmill. Horses have a consistent gait after 4 to 6 sessions of water treadmill exercise 27 ; therefore, horses in the present study were walked on an underwater treadmill

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

water treadmill training. Progress was regularly monitored via physical examination and in some instances by evaluation of video recordings provided by the owner during the follow-up period until normal ambulation was regained. Statistical analysis

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

also avoided (eg, water treadmill exercise). 37 Corrective asymmetrical shoeing with more support (wider branch) on the side of the injured CL is recommended based on the identification of lesions whether on the medial or lateral side of the hock. 36

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association