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in the small animal setting. Small animal veterinarians commonly wear a variation of business attire or scrubs, often with a white coat. 6 – 9 In small animal medicine, studies have most often shown client preference for veterinarians dressed in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

nontraditional companion animals such as rodents, reptiles, and amphibians that spread zoonoses. 4 Treating and preventing infections in domestic animals can help reduce zoonoses. Veterinarians are on the front lines of early detection, prevention, and diagnosis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

ingredients and other components associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, and its response, have coalesced to result in inadequate animal drug supplies. 2 To forestall this, the US FDA has encouraged that all entities, including clients, veterinarians, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, veterinarians, animal venue operators, animal exhibitors, visitors to animal venues and exhibits, and others concerned with control of disease and with minimizing health risks associated with animal contact in public settings. The report has undergone several

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The shortage of veterinarians working in food supply veterinary medicine has been identified as a high priority, and several actions have been suggested to help alleviate the shortage of veterinarians in this discipline. 1–4 Addressing the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Veterinarians’ mental health has been an area of increased concern in recent years. Numerous studies from around the world suggest that veterinarians have higher rates of psychological distress including anxiety, depression

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Authors , , and
Animals in Public Contact subcommittee of the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians Animals in Public Contact subcommittee of the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians

Abstract

Objective—To assess the number of zoonotic disease outbreaks associated with animal exhibits and identify published recommendations for preventing zoonotic disease transmission from animals to people in exhibit settings.

Design—Literature review and survey of state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists.

Procedure—MEDLINE and agriculture databases were searched from 1966 through 2000. Retrieved references and additional resources provided by the authors were reviewed. A survey was sent to state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists to determine whether their states had written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases in animal exhibition venues, whether their states maintained a listing of animal exhibitors in the state, and whether they had any information on recent outbreaks involving animals in exhibitions.

Results—11 published outbreaks were identified. These outbreaks occurred in a variety of settings including petting zoos, farms, and a zoological park. An additional episode involving exposure to a potentially rabid bear required extensive public health resources. A survey of state public health veterinarians identified 16 additional unpublished outbreaks or incidents. Most states did not have written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases or any means to disseminate educational materials to animal exhibitors.

Conclusions—Recent outbreaks of zoonotic diseases associated with contact with animals in exhibition venues highlight concerns for disease transmission to public visitors. Only a handful of states have written guidelines for preventing zoonotic disease transmission in animal exhibition venues, and published recommendations currently available focus on preventing enteric diseases and largely do not address other zoonotic diseases or prevention of bite wounds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1105–1109)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

urban, veterinary medicine has shifted to an emphasis on companion animals. 1 This shift has been accompanied by reports of shortages of veterinarians in practice disciplines related to food animal medicine and food safety, 2–5 compiled under the term

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association