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E quine gastric ulcer syndrome is an umbrella term to describe gastric disease in horses. It encompasses equine squamous gastric disease (ESGD) and equine glandular gastric disease (EGGD). 1 , 2 ESGD is further divided into primary and secondary

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the perioperative period in humans and other animals. 2–4 Also, blood flow to the retina and visual cortex can be reduced by anesthesia. From these changes, perioperative ophthalmic complications can occur. Perioperative corneal ulcer and acute vision

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

(ie, refractory) corneal ulcers (also called indolent ulcers, spontaneous chronic corneal epithelial defects, and Boxer ulcers) commonly affect middle-aged to older dogs, with the average age of onset being 8 to 9 years. 16–18 Medical treatment alone

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

difficult for the veterinarian to perform a good awake oral examination. Common oral diseases such as periodontitis and endodontic disease may present with oral lesions, although erosions, ulcers, and pigmented or leukoplakic white lesions are the subject of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine prevalence and risk factors for decubital ulcers of the shoulder in sows.

Design

Descriptive cross-sectional study.

Sample population

All females of breeding age in a large confinement swine facility.

Procedure

1,916 females were examined for lesions of the skin over the tuber of the spine of the scapula and for body condition scoring. Observational data were combined with sow data (parity, date of farrowing, litter size) contained in computerized records.

Results

Decubital ulcers were observed in 8.3% of females, predominantly lactating sows. Ulcer prevalence was strongly associated with time after farrowing. Lesions apparently healed rapidly after weaning. Ulcer prevalence was associated with low body condition scores, but was not associated with parity.

Implications

Decubital ulcers are a multifactorial condition. Housing on concrete floors per se did not result in ulcers. Prolonged recumbency during parturition, reduced activity in early lactation, periparturient illness, thin body condition, moist skin, and floor type are potential risk factors. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;208:1058–1062)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Gastric ulcer syndrome is common in horses used for many competitive activities, including racing, 1–4 dressage and show jumping, 5,6 endurance events, 7 and western performance. 8 Exercise and training are proven risk factors for EGUS, 3

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

resolving. Some of these eicosanoids, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are involved in the pathophysiology, prevention, and resolution of gastric ulcers. Traditionally, PUFAs in equine diets have been provided as SC-PUFAs from vegetable oils and forage

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Corneal ulceration is one of the most common ocular surface diseases encountered in veterinary ophthalmologic practice. 1–3 Infected corneal ulcers can rapidly progress and result in loss of vision if not treated appropriately. 2 Clinical signs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and trichiasis in the conjunctival region of the absent tarsal plate in the upper eyelid of the right eye. The axial cornea of the right eye had an approximately 3 × 3-mm ulcer that extended approximately 60% of its depth and was accompanied by white

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare mean healing times after debridement, debridement with grid keratotomy, and superficial keratectomy in cats with nonhealing corneal ulcers.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—29 cats with 36 nonhealing corneal ulcers.

Procedure—Medical records of cats with nonhealing corneal ulcers were reviewed. Signalment, duration of clinical signs, ophthalmic abnormalities, and response to various treatment protocols were recorded.

Results—Mean age of affected cats was 7 years, 8 months. Affected breeds included domestic shorthair (17 cats), Persian (9), Himalayan (2), and Siamese (1). Clinical signs were evident for approximately 2 weeks prior to referral. Both eyes were affected in 4 cats. Mean healing time of ulcers treated with superficial debridement was 30 days. Mean healing time of ulcers treated with superficial debridement and grid keratotomy was 42 days. Superficial keratectomy was performed on 2 eyes and resulted in a healing time of 2 weeks. Formation of a corneal sequestrum was evident in 2 of 21 eyes treated with superficial debridement. Formation of a corneal sequestrum was evident in 4 of 13 eyes treated with superficial debridement and grid keratotomy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Brachycephalic cats appear to be predisposed to developing nonhealing corneal ulcers. The combination of superficial debridement and grid keratotomy did not decrease mean healing time of nonhealing ulcers, compared with superficial debridement alone. Grid keratotomy may predispose cats with corneal ulcers to develop a corneal sequestrum. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:733–735)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association