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practice is usually higher (1.75 m/s; range = 0.7 to 2.8). 17 The walk is the gait most commonly used especially for rehabilitation purposes, but some training centers also perform WT sessions at the trot with an average speed of 4.3 m/s (range = 3.4 to 5

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

The 3 most common gaits of equids (walk, trot, and canter or gallop) have been extensively evaluated. 1 Various other gaits of horses selectively bred for their natural, characteristic additional gaits (ie, gaited horse breeds) have been

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

In healthy dogs, the forelimbs bear approximately 60% of the body weight and the hind limbs bear approximately 40% of the body weight, independent of gait (eg, walking 1–4 or trotting 5–9 ). Differences among breeds attributable to the relative

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

The walk and trot are both symmetrical gaits. In dogs, there are 2 phases to the walk; ipsilateral 2-legged support of the body alternates with 3-legged support of the body. 1 In the trot, the body is supported by a diagonal pair of limbs that

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Patterns of joint angular excursions, net joint moments, and power of the hind limbs have been reported 1 for trotting Greyhounds and Labrador Retrievers, and it appears that there is some variability between breeds in these measures. In

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Motion symmetry is believed to be the hallmark of an orthopedically normal gait and forms the basis of clinical gait assessment in quadrupeds. It depends on the observation of limb, trunk, and head motions at a walk and trot, and there is often

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

human IMU system investigating equine trunk movement found that the error of the IMU sensor, compared with results for an optical kinematic system, was < 7% of the total range of motion in all 3 orthogonal directions during walking, trotting, and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

lameness. 11–13 Although alterations in those variables have been detected at both a walk and a trot, the alterations are more pronounced at a trot. 11 Because optical kinematics suffer from many of the limitations of stationary force platform analyses

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

trotting. Materials and Methods Horses —Twelve nonlame horses and 12 horses with chronic unilateral lameness of the pelvic limbs were used in the study. The nonlame horses included 3 mares and 9 geldings; mean age of these horses was 14.5 years (range

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Although the gait has been evaluated in amputee dogs during walking, 9 the authors are not aware of any prior gait analysis of amputees during trotting, a motion whereby limbs may have higher GRFs and possible periods of support on a single limb. The GRF

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research