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paddock. After the traumatic episode, unilateral epistaxis was initially observed by the breeder, but no treatment was rendered following the trauma. At the time of admission, he was bright and alert. The heart rate was 56 beats/min (reference range [RR

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

trauma. 1 – 4 In cats, bile peritonitis is rare and may be secondary to trauma or iatrogenic in nature following procedures such as cholecystocentesis or needle core liver biopsy. 1 , 5 – 9 Diagnosis of bile peritonitis is confirmed when the measurement

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Trauma, defined as tissue injury caused by violence or accident that occurs suddenly and includes physical damage to the body, 1 is a common cause of morbidity and death in dogs. Results of large-scale epidemiological studies 2,3 indicate that

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

directly associated with risk of seizures in humans. 6 Posttraumatic seizures (ie, seizures developing after head trauma) can result from brain damage attributable to a direct mechanical force to the head and brain (primary TBI) or nonmechanically induced

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In veterinary patients with head trauma, the potential for development of seizures is an important concern. Seizures following head trauma have been well described in human patients. 1,2 Presently, there are no studies examining the link between

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and potentially surgery as indicated, but this recheck was declined at that time. The owner reportedly continued nursing care and physical therapy at home. A follow-up neurologic examination was performed 4 months after the initial trauma. The patient

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

extensively evaluated individuals sustaining traumatic injury, and these studies have resulted in identification of risk factors and outcome predictors. In particular, age and injury severity influence outcome in human trauma patients; older or more severely

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Trauma is a common reason for companion animals to be brought to veterinary emergency hospitals, representing approximately 12% of all admissions. 1,2 In cats with traumatic injuries, the thoracic region is one of the most commonly affected areas

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Blunt force trauma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in raptorial species, with collisions into anthropogenic structures (vehicles, windows, wind turbines, buildings, and power lines) being the most common cause. 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

described methods for characterizing data quality within large databases. 1 – 4 Clinical research registries including Trauma registries 5 serve as collective sources of information to conduct studies that provide guidance toward improving patient care

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research