Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 64 items for :

  • "tracheal collapse" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Introduction Tracheal collapse (TC) is a common cause of respiratory difficulty and cough in older small and toy-breed dogs. 1 , 2 Endoscopy is considered the gold standard for diagnosis of TC, detecting concurrent diseases, and identifying

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

hematoma), 1,5–7 foreign body, 1 and granulomatous tracheitis. 8 Tracheal collapse not associated with trauma or compression by extraluminal causes in equine species is an uncommon disorder, as evidenced by few reports 2,9–15 in the literature. Tracheal

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Tracheal collapse is a common cause of cough in mature, small-breed dogs. This disease is defined either by narrowing of the lumen of the trachea, prolapse of the dorsal tracheal membrane, or a combination of those abnormalities. 1 Tracheal

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Tracheal collapse, a degenerative disorder of primarily toy dog breeds, leads to diminished airway caliber and a spectrum of clinical signs ranging from cough to respiratory distress. 1 , 2 Screening by thoracic radiography is

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Tracheal collapse is a progressive disease of the airways that primarily affects smalland toy-breed dogs. 1,2 The airway becomes dorsoventrally flattened beginning with laxity of the trachealis dorsalis muscle, followed by chondromalacia and

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

calf is to the left in both images. Tracheal collapse and stenosis secondary to perinatal rib fractures were diagnosed on the basis of clinical and diagnostic imaging findings. Initially, the owner agreed to pursue endoscopic placement of a stent

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

been placed for treatment of collapse of the cervical portion of the trachea. At that time, preoperative tracheobronchoscopy revealed grade III tracheal collapse with no substantial intrathoracic or mainstem bronchus collapse. Tracheal ring prostheses

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Tracheal collapse is a chronic respiratory condition commonly diagnosed in small- and toy-breed dogs. 1–4 Dynamic mechanical collapse, the traditionally considered form of tracheal collapse, can be caused by a combination of progressive malacia

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction In dogs, TC occurs most commonly in small and toy breeds and can result in substantial respiratory difficulty. 1 Tracheal collapse can include various disorders, such as tracheal chondromalacia, weakened or redundant dorsal

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the role of bacteria in bronchoscopically diagnosed tracheal collapse in dogs by evaluating qualitative results of bacteriologic cultures.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—37 dogs with tracheal collapse.

Procedure—Clinical records for dogs with tracheal collapse confirmed with bronchoscopy were reviewed. A protected catheter brush was used to obtain samples for bacteriologic culture from the large airways.

Results—Results of bacterial culture were negative for 5 of 29 dogs. For 24 dogs, 1 (n = 10), 2 (6), or ≥ 3 (8) species of bacteria were isolated. Pseudomonas spp were isolated most frequently (17/29), and a single Pseudomona ssp grew in 7 samples. Other bacteria included Enterobacter spp (4/29), Citrobacter spp (3/29), and Moraxella spp, Klebsiella spp, Bordetella spp, or Acinetobacter spp (2/29 dogs each). Anaerobic and aerobic cultures yielded positive results in samples from 2 dogs. Cytologic results were available for 13 dogs with positive results of bacteriologic culture; epithelial cells were reported most commonly. Five samples had a small number of neutrophils; bacteria were identified cytologically in 2 of 5 samples that contained neutrophils. Bacteria were also seen in 2 samples that lacked inflammatory cells.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bacteria are commonly isolated from samples obtained via airway brushing in dogs with tracheal collapse; however, in the absence of cytologic confirmation of inflammation or infection, an association between bacteria and clinical signs of tracheal collapse cannot be established. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1247–1250)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association