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life stages or more than 6 ticks found in a borough [county equivalent] within 1 year) of R sanguineus in 1 region of Alaska. 7 Because of the low prevalence of ticks in Alaska, few residents have had encounters with ticks and tick-borne disease

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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-tailed deer population, and the popularity of outdoor activities like camping and hiking. The bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii ( R rickettsii ) causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a tick-borne disease of people and dogs. Despite being identified

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, 3 and is responsible for more fatalities than any other tick-borne disease in North America. 1 However, initial presentation resembles other milder infections, and delays in diagnosis are common. 1 Despite modern medical care and antibiotics, case

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Granulocytic anaplasmosis is an emerging tick-borne disease that is widely distributed in dogs in the upper Midwest, New England, parts of the Mid-Atlantic States, and northern California in the United States; southern Canada; and many parts of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine seroprevalence of antibodies against Leishmania spp among dogs other than Foxhounds in the United States.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Sample Population—957 serum samples from dogs throughout the United States submitted between January 2000 and August 2001 to the Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health at Michigan State University for serologic testing for tick-borne diseases.

Procedure—Samples were tested for antibodies against Leishmania spp with an immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) assay. Samples with positive results were submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for confirmatory testing.

Results—Results of the IFA assay were negative for 939 of 957 samples. For 16 samples, titers were from 1:16 to 1:64, and titers in these dogs were considered likely to be a result of cross-reactivity with antibodies directed against other organisms. For the remaining 2 samples, the titers were ≥ 1:128. One of these samples was from a blood donor dog that had never had any clinical signs of leishmaniasis. Followup samples from both dogs also had Leishmania IFA titers ≥ 1:128. Both dogs had antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi, as determined with a radioimmunoprecipitation assay.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that the seroprevalence of antibodies against Leishmania spp in dogs in the United States was low. However, results further suggested that leishmaniasis may not be limited to Foxhounds in the United States. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:603–606)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of Anaplasma phagocytophilum may require 12 to 24 hours of attachment. Although these organisms cause two of the more commonly recognized tick-borne diseases in dogs, as veterinarians, we recognize that ticks can transmit other equally serious and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with Kansas State University and the USDA resulted in development of a new ground breaking vaccine to protect cattle against bovine anaplasomosis. 1 This research paved the way for continued collaborations on important tick-borne diseases. Ongoing

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

rates were recorded as 47.4% for Borrelia burgdorferi and 3.3% for Anaplasma phagocytophilum . These 2 bacteria are important tick-borne disease pathogens and cause disease in horses, dogs, and humans. Maintenance of these infections that occur in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association