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thoracic surgeries for animals with thoracic neoplasia have not been previously evaluated. Bleakly et al 3 compared short-term outcomes associated with median sternotomy and lateral thoracotomy for lung lobectomy in dogs and found increased fluid

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

chronic history and thus have more generalized thoracic inflammatory changes at the time of surgery, as has been described previously. 5 The concern in those cases is whether VATS can be as effective as open thoracic surgery (via intercostal thoracotomy

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

smaller incisions with the aid of conventional thoracoscopic instruments, cameras, and video displays. Similar minimally invasive techniques (total thoracoscopic surgery and video-assisted thoracic surgery) have become standard for treatment of early non

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 3 cats and 72 dogs that had a fishhook endoscopically or surgically retrieved from the stomach or esophagus were reviewed. Endoscopic retrieval was successful in 41 of 62 (66%) animals, and retrieval time and hospitalization time for endoscopic retrieval were significantly shorter than times for surgical retrieval. Rate of failure of endoscopic retrieval was higher for animals with treble-barb, rather than single-barb, fishhooks. Whether a fishhook could be successfully retrieved endoscopically was independent of body weight, amount of time the fishhook had been present, location of the hook, and orientation within the esophagus.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

  • Palliative treatment of tetralogy of Fallot in dogs has included β-adrenergic blockers to reduce right ventricular obstruction secondary to infundibular spasm, creation of systemic to pulmonary artery shunts to increase pulmonary blood flow, or both.

  • Primary definitive open-heart repair is the preferred treatment in humans, but successful correction of defects in dogs is rare.

  • Adaptation of cannulation, perfusion, and myocardial protection techniques used for human pediatric cardiac patients may improve the success of cardiac surgery in dogs.

  • Open-heart correction of tetralogy of Fallot in dogs is an alternative that may be a superior therapeutic option.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. ABBREVIATIONS ACHR Acetylcholine receptor CMM Cranial mediastinal mass IQR Interquartile range VATS Video-assisted thoracic surgery Footnotes a. Edrophonium chloride, Enlon Mylan Institutional, Rockford, Ill. b. JMP, version 9.0.2, SAS

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

thoracotomy; 3 previous studies evaluating short-term (within 2 weeks) outcome for dogs undergoing thoracic surgery documented mortality rates of 21% (21/98), 14 10% (7/70), 15 and 44% (29/67). 16 Trauma-scoring systems in human patients have been

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To report and compare the surgical site infection (SSI) rates for clean and clean-contaminated procedures performed by either a minimally invasive surgical or open surgical approach in a large population of dogs and cats.

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—179 patients (dogs and cats) undergoing minimally invasive abdominal or thoracic surgery.

Procedures—Case information from all animals that underwent minimally invasive abdominal or thoracic surgery was prospectively collected and compared with an existing database of the same information collected from 379 patients undergoing laparotomy or thoracotomy via an open surgical approach. For both groups, an SSI was defined as any surgical wound in which purulent discharge was observed within 14 days after the procedure. Follow-up for all patients was obtained by direct examination or telephone interviews.

Results—Overall SSI rate in the minimally invasive surgery (MIS) group was 1.7% and in the open surgery (OS) group was 5.5%. On univariate analysis, there was a significantly lower SSI rate in the MIS group, compared with the SSI rate for the OS group. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, this difference appeared to be a result of the fact that surgery times were longer (median, 105 vs 75 minutes) and hair was clipped ≥ 4 hours prior to surgery for more animals (23% vs 11 %) in the OS group, compared with the MIS group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—MIS may be associated with a lower SSI rate, compared with OS, but confounding factors such as differences in surgery time and preoperative preparation contributed in part to this finding. As such, surgical approach cannot be categorized as an independent risk factor for SSIs in small animals until further studies are performed.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

other dogs, owner-reported return to function was full or acceptable. See page 208 Treatment of intrathoracic grass awn migration with video-assisted thoracic surgery in two dogs Two dogs were examined because of suspected intrathoracic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/min), but the owner reported that the dog appeared comfortable at home. Discussion Although scarcely reported in the veterinary literature, intra- and postoperative arrhythmias are commonly observed in human patients undergoing thoracic surgery. In

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association