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respiratory tract for thermoregulation and dissipation of excess heat. Although respiratory evaporative cooling is just as effective as sweating on the basis of the amount of heat/mL of water evaporated, thermoregulation by respiratory evaporation of water is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of environment on thermoregulation. Materials and Methods Animals —Twenty black crossbred beef heifers with a mean ± SD body weight of 217.8 ± 12.1 kg were selected for the study. All calves were approximately 6 months old. Calves were owned by

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To document any discordance between the set temperature and independently measured temperature of neonatal incubators in order to determine the potential of neonatal incubators to cause hypothermia or hyperthermia in neonatal animals.

SAMPLE

5 different veterinary neonatal incubators from 2 separate manufacturers.

METHODS

Internal temperatures of 5 incubators from 2 manufacturers were monitored with both internal and external monitoring devices to determine how much incubator temperatures might vary from what is reported on the incubator thermostat. The study was conducted on May 25, 2022.

RESULTS

Increases in temperature as measured by thermocouple and infrared sensors of > 2 °C were detected in 3 of the 5 (60%; 95% CI, 17% to 93%) tested incubators. Temperatures exceeded 41 °C at times, despite the incubator thermostat being set to 35 °C.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Neonatal puppies have a decreased capacity to thermoregulate and are susceptible to both hypothermia and hyperthermia if environmental temperatures are not kept within a proper range. Core temperatures below 35.0 °C lead to bradycardia, dyspnea, loss of suckle reflex, hypoglycemia, gastrointestinal ileus, and multiple organ failure; temperatures above 41.1 °C lead to pulmonary edema, petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhage in multiple organs, and death.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

this end, we investigated the physiologic and behavioral effects of TB and compared them with SB, specifically measuring thermal antinociception, food and kaolin intake, fecal output, self-injurious behavior and sedation, and thermoregulation

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To describe an anatomic and surgical approach to the efferent parasympathetic branches of the pterygopalatine ganglia in sheep, with particular reference to the ethmoidal nerve and innervation of nasal and cerebral blood vessels.

Animals

12 adult sheep used for monolateral (n = 7) or bilateral (n = 5) ethmoidal neurectomy; 2 sheep used for angiography (1 live sheep for digital subtraction angiography, 1 embalmed cadaver for injection studies); and 5 embalmed cadavers, 4 frozen specimens, and 2 dry skulls used for dissection, x-rays, and computed tomographic (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) scans.

Procedure

Transverse (coronal) MR scans, transverse, sagittal, and dorsal CT scans, radiography, angiography, photographic images, and dissections of embalmed material were used to study the topographic anatomy of the temporal and pterygopalatine fossae of the head.

Results

Images were stored, then compared with photographs of frozen sections from the same or a similar specimen to plan a surgical approach to the ethmoidal nerve. Mono- and bilateral experimental ethmoidal neurectomies were performed, allowing characterization of a safe and reliable method. The series of pterygopalatine ganglia typical of this species was localized, dissected, and analyzed for topographic relations.

Conclusions

From the results, a new approach to the efferent branches of the pterygopalatine ganglia (ethmoidal nerve) for experimental parasympathectomy of the cerebral and nasal circle is proposed. This experimental approach could be used for studies involving thermoregulation of the face, and in experimental control of blood flow in the nasal cavity and rostral part of the brain. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:105–108)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine epidemiologic characteristics, clinical findings, and treatment outcome of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) toxicosis in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—21 dogs with evidence of accidental 5-HTP ingestion.

Procedure—Information was retrieved from the National Animal Poison Control Center database. Records of dogs ingesting 5-HTP between January 1989 and February 1999 were reviewed for information on signalment, dose ingested, clinical signs (onset, severity, duration), treatments administered, and outcome.

Results—Clinical signs of toxicosis developed in 19 of 21 (90%) dogs. Neurologic signs included seizures (9 dogs), depression (6), tremors (5), hyperesthesia (5), and ataxia (4). Gastrointestinal tract signs included vomiting or diarrhea (12 dogs), signs of abdominal pain (3), and hypersalivation (2). Other clinical signs were hyperthermia (7 dogs) and transient blindness (3). Three dogs died. No important clinical laboratory or necropsy findings were reported. The doses of 5-HTP ingested ranged from 2.5 to 573 mg/kg (1.1 to 260 mg/lb) of body weight; the minimum toxic dose reported in our study was 23.6 mg/kg (10.7 mg/lb), and the minimum lethal dose was 128 mg/kg (58.1 mg/lb). Onset of signs ranged from 10 minutes to 4 hours after ingestion, and signs lasted up to 36 hours. Of 17 dogs with clinical signs of toxicosis that received treatment, 16 recovered; treatment consisted of decontamination, seizure control, thermoregulation, fluid therapy, and supportive care.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ingestion of 5-HTP in dogs can result in a potentially life-threatening syndrome resembling serotonin syndrome in humans, which requires prompt and aggressive care. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:1937–1940)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

approximately 2 m of herniated jejunum and a portion of the omentum. Because the extensive fibrous adhesions between the parietal and common vaginal tunics of the left testis would disrupt scrotal thermoregulation, a left unilateral castration was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and body condition score on respiratory thermoregulation of healthy dogs Results of a study involving 52 brachycephalic and 53 nonbrachycephalic dogs exposed to cool and hot treatments confirmed that respiratory thermoregulation capacity of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

for laminitis. Mammals are capable of refined thermoregulation as the ambient temperature changes. The distal portion of horse limbs is relatively devoid of muscles and fat to provide insulation; therefore, it is an ideal site to evaluate a horse

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Physical exercise results in net heat production, as only 20% to 25% of energy used by muscle is converted to mechanical energy. 13 Thermoregulation is the maintenance of internal body temperature within a thermoneutral zone. Horses maintain body

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association