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Medical infrared thermal imaging, also known as thermal imaging or thermography, is a valuable noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique increasingly used in clinical practice. Medical infrared thermal imaging involves the recording of cutaneous

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

limitations of these different modalities, infrared thermography (IRT), also called radiometric thermal imaging, has been explored for its potential as a more clinically applicable tool and has been utilized to assess bowel perfusion in a porcine model 18 and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

.4]) + 46.4. Study procedures Profile digital thermal images b of individual calves were obtained from immediately outside each pen via convenience sampling during the 6 am and 3 pm hours for 10 days over a 14-day period. The time for the afternoon

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

thermography include a lack of sensitivity to deep lesions and chronic processes as well as a lack of specificity. 8 Visual thermal images are generated with an infrared camera and computerized data manipulation. All objects with temperatures greater than

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

bull was first restrained in a closed stall and allowed approximately 30 minutes to acclimate to ambient temperature. Global thermal images were initially obtained at a focal distance of 3 m from the anterior, posterior, left, and right perspectives

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To compare the infrared thermographic appearance of bovine ears that had received contaminated growth promotant implants with ears that had received clean implants and ears without implants.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

32 yearling crossbred beef steers with a mean weight of 322 kg (708 lbs).

Procedure

Contaminated (n = 16) and clean (16) implants were placed in the ears of feedlot cattle. Nonimplanted (n = 32) ears served as a within-animal control for thermographic comparisons. Images of rostral and caudal surfaces were obtained during a 21-day period, using an infrared thermal imaging radiometer. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine the relationship between mean temperature in a zone on the rostral surface of the ear and at 3 locations (proximal, middle, distal) on the caudal surface of the ear (response variables) with treatment (ears with contaminated implants or clean implants vs control ears with no implants), time (repeated day of measurement), and interactions among these variables.

Results

Significant temperature differences existed between ears with contaminated implants and control ears. Temperatures for ears with clean implants were significantly higher than control ears on day 2. At low ambient temperatures when the ears became wet, a greater temperature contrast was detected between ears with contaminated implants and control ears.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Thermal imaging of the ears of feedlot cattle is a noninvasive diagnostic tool that can be used to identify cattle with abscesses caused by contaminated growth-promotant implants. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1320–1324)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

quantified. 6 Over the years, the equipment and technology have become more sophisticated. In the 1960s, color images were introduced, and in 1965, thermal imaging was used in equine medicine. 7 In the 1970s, computers were used to provide color images and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

land inappropriately on the limb. High-definition infrared thermal imaging revealed a pattern of reduced skin temperature in the left lumbar and gluteal regions suggestive of disrupted sympathetic control of peripheral blood flow. Nuclear scintigraphy

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

.1638/2008-0087.1 24. Bashiruddin JB , Mann J , Finch R , et al. Preliminary study of the use of thermal imaging to assess surface temperatures during foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in cattle, sheep and pigs . In: Report of the 2006 session of the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

vertebral region, 4 and 1 required sedation and anesthesia, respectively, for further diagnostic workup. Additional diagnostic testing performed on the cases with a vertebral disorder included radiography (n = 6), ultrasonography (4), thermal imaging (1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association