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History A 6-year-old 27.8-kg castrated male Belgian Malinois dog was admitted to the Auburn University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a 2-month history of lethargy, tenesmus, hematochezia, and weight loss. At the initial onset of clinical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 9-year-old intact male Cocker Spaniel was referred for investigation of an 8-month history of hematochezia, fecal tenesmus, and intermittent diarrhea, with a fecal score ranging from 3/7 (log-shaped stools with moist surface) to 7

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

sexually intact or castrated late in life. 1,7,8,10 Although no single cause has been identified, the condition is thought to occur as a result of muscular atrophy, neurogenic atrophy, hormonal influence, and tenesmus secondary to prostatic disease or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

An 11-year-old 9.5-kg (20.9-lb) castrated male cat was evaluated at the MJR-VHUP because of a 1-week history of constipation, tenesmus, and intermittent vomiting. The cat had been evaluated 6 weeks prior by the referring veterinarian for tenesmus

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 12-year-old 32.4-kg (71.3-lb) castrated male Labrador Retriever was evaluated at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital because of a 2-week history of tenesmus and hematochezia. The owner also reported that the dog had some

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 28.1-kg (61.8-lb) 11-year-old castrated male German Shepherd Dog mix was examined because of a 3-month history of hematochezia and tenesmus. Pertinent history included treatment for Giardia and hookworms 3 months prior, a subcutaneous mast

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

laparotomy before IOMT. Urinary incontinence was defined as involuntary dribbling of urine. Fecal incontinence was defined as involuntary fecal losses. Tenesmus was defined as persistent or prolonged straining or painful defecation. Recurrence was defined as

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

necrosis of the skin at the surgery site and tenesmus. Neurologic examination findings were considered normal. Clinical evaluation and radiography confirmed severe dorsal displacement of the rectum as a result of the removal of sacrocaudal and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

lesions. In a retrospective case series 6 of 13 dogs that underwent rectal resection by means of a dorsal inverted-U approach, postoperative complications included transient tenesmus (n = 12), transient hematochezia (3), and anastomotic dehiscence (4

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association