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The Pathophysiology of Tendon Injury Naturally occurring tendon injuries in animals provide a translational avenue to study pathophysiology and evaluate novel therapeutics that benefit both veterinary and human clinical patients. Specifically

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Background Tendinopathy and desmopathy are major causes of lameness and reduced performance in horses. Tendon and ligament fibers have some elasticity, allowing for the elongation of fibers during exercise; injury occurs when the strain

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

stimulation or priming, referred to as MSC licensing, shows promise. Equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) injuries are a naturally occurring injury in a veterinary population that has benefited from local administration of naive autologous MSCs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Tendinitis is a common debilitating injury in performance horses, comprising up to 43% of injuries in racing Thoroughbreds and resulting in retirement of up to 14% of horses. 1–3 Timely repair of injured tendon with restoration of normal tissue

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Tendinitis of the digital flexor tendons remains a catastrophic condition in all types of sport horses. Racing statistics indicate tendinitis is the most frequent cause of breakdown and is often a career-ending event in Thoroughbreds. 1

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

interphalangeal (pastern) joint. 6 = Distal interphalangeal (coffin) joint. A = Humerus. B = Ulna and radius. C = Carpus. D = Metacarpus. E = Proximal phalanx. ET = Extensor tendon. F = Middle phalanx. G = Distal phalanx. SL = Sesamoid ligaments. Asterisks

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Tendinitis is a common cause of breakdown injury in equine athletes and accounts for 30% to 50% of all racing injuries. 1–3 Tendon injuries are often degenerative injuries, and the prevalence of tendinitis increases with age. 3 Despite

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

or be referred from elbow joint disease or nerve root signature from primary spinal cord lesions. Supraspinatus tendon injury as a potential source of shoulder joint pain has garnered considerable interest from the veterinary orthopedic and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

focused on stromal cells derived from bone marrow aspirates. Alternate sources of progenitor cells have been described for tendon repair in other species, 15–17 and adipose-derived progenitor cells have been evaluated for efficacy in horses with

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

structure were thickened (width, 4 mm). Bursal distension was observed cranial to the infraspinatus tendon and dorsal to the caudal eminence of the GT but was most evident caudal to the infraspinatus tendon ( Figure 1 ). The skin wound was in close proximity

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association