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B iological samples, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP), are typically frozen at either –80 °C or –20 °C with continuous temperature monitoring of the freezer with alarms in a research setting. 1 , 2 However, in veterinary practice, these samples

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Body temperature is one of the primary vital parameters (temperature, pulse, and respiration) obtained during the initial physical evaluation of veterinary patients. The reference range for core body temperature in dogs is 37.2° to 39.2°C. 1

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Accurate assessment of body temperature is an important aspect of the physical examination in veterinary patients. Rectal temperature is the standard measurement used to assess body temperature in animals, but the use of axillary temperature has

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Quick, accurate, and easily obtained measurements of body temperature can assist in the early detection of the first case of a contagious disease and is an important part of an effective equine biosecurity program. 1,2 Traditionally, body

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Body temperature determination is an important component of the physical examination of an animal. 1 Traditionally, veterinary practitioners have depended on equilibrium-type rectal thermometers to determine body temperature. 1,2 Although

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Body temperature of the horse is routinely assessed by measurement of rectal temperature during physical examination. The normal reference range of rectal temperature in horses has been well established and is 37.5 to 38.3 °C. 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In horses, blood flow to the hoof is associated with digital perfusion and temperature. 1 Temperature changes in the skin at the coronary band could indicate changes in blood flow to the coronary band and possibly the hoof. An elevated hoof

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Assessment of body temperature is a fundamental component of the physical examination in veterinary patients, and the information obtained often guides clinical decisions. Invasive contact devices, such as esophageal and pulmonary

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

temperature of both superficial and deeper tissues. 1–4 Lowering tissue temperature decreases tissue metabolism, edema formation, muscle spasm, and signs of pain and minimizes the inflammatory processes associated with soft tissue injury. 5–8 Lowering the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

The effect of exercise on body temperature in horses has been evaluated mainly indoors with controlled experimental conditions by use of treadmill exercise tests with body temperature recorded as blood temperature (obtained by inserting a thermal

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research