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I njury to the suspensory ligament (SL) of horses can be a career-ending injury across a multitude of disciplines. 1 – 3 Injuries to the SL, both in the forelimbs and the hind limbs, are typically discussed with reference to 3 regions. These

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

The SL of the forelimb is commonly injured in horses that participate in a variety of disciplines, including racehorses and sport horses. 1–5 Suspensory ligament desmitis is often associated with decreased performance and can be a career

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Inflammation of the interosseous muscle (ie, suspensory ligament) is recognized as a potential cause of lameness in horses used in a variety of athletic sports, although it appears to be more common in Thoroughbred racehorses and in horses used as

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Inflammation of the proximal aspect of the interosseus medius muscle, or suspensory ligament (SL), (ie, proximal suspensory desmitis) of one or both pelvic or thoracic limbs is a common cause of lameness of horses. 1 – 4 Most

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Injury of the interosseous muscle, commonly known as suspensory ligament desmitis, is an important cause of lameness in horses, especially athletic horses. 1 The interosseous muscle is subdivided into a proximal portion, a body portion, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Inflammation of the PSB (proximal sesamoiditis) in horses typically involves desmopathy of the insertion of the interosseous muscle (ie, suspensory ligament); this condition is characterized by inflammation and decreased strength of the Sharpey

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

PA Proteoglycan accumulation PPID Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction SL Suspensory ligament 11βHSD1 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 11βHSD2 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 Footnotes a. Thiopental, Inresa, Freiburg

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

revealed enlargement of the cross-sectional area of the PASL, in comparison with that of the contralateral limb. Diffuse regions of reduced echogenicity within the suspensory ligament and slight irregularity of the palmar aspect of the cortex of the MC3

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

ESWT Extracorporeal shock wave therapy CPSD Chronic proximal suspensory desmitis MTIV Fourth metatarsal bone OSL-MC Origin of the suspensory ligament at the metacarpus SL Suspensory ligament RU Radiopharmaceutical uptake

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

The medical records of 34 horses with a diagnosis of avulsion of the origin of the suspensory ligament that had been admitted to the veterinary medical teaching hospital between 1980 and 1993 were identified. In addition to clinical examination, 21 of 34 horses had scintigraphy and radiography performed during their examination. The usefulness of scintigraphy and radiography were assessed by comparing the initial findings reported in the medical record to those obtained in a retrospective review of the images. Thirty other horses with scintigraphic lesions of the proximal aspect of the third metacarpal/metatarsal bone but with a confirmed diagnosis other than avulsion of the suspensory ligament served as controls for lesion specificity. Scintigraphy (bone phase, n=21) revealed increased uptake in all horses in both reviews. Only 14 of 21 (67%) horses radiographed, however, had at least 1 lesion during the initial radiographic evaluation that was reported to be suggestive of avulsion. When the radiographs were reviewed retrospectively, the radiologist identified 18 of 21 (86%) horses with lesions consistent with avulsion. The interpretation of scintigraphy appeared to be a more repeatable and sensitive diagnostic method than radiography. However, though scintigraphy was sensitive in identifying inflammation of the proximal aspect of the metacarpal/metatarsal region, no specific diagnosis of avulsion could be made without coincident radiography; the specificity of scintigraphy in diagnosing avulsion of the suspensory ligament was only 41% (21/51). Radiography of the proximal aspect of the third metacarpal/tarsal bone was found to be falsely negative in 3 of 21 (14%) horses on retrospective evaluation and in 7 of 21 (33%) horses on initial evaluation, perhaps because radiographic signs of disease were subtle.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association