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Introduction Enucleation is indicated in rabbits to alleviate the irreversibly painful and/or blinding consequences of various ocular diseases. 1 In rabbits and other mammalian species, en bloc and subconjunctival enucleation techniques are

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

orbital silicone implant can be placed following enucleation through either the transpalpebral or subconjunctival approach. 2 The subconjunctival enucleation approach is faster, results in less hemorrhage, and provides a more cosmetic result. 1 This

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether, and at what time, penicillin enters milk at a concentration that is detectable following bulbar subconjunctival injection in lactating dairy cows.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—66 Holstein cows that were at least 2 weeks past calving and had not been treated with antibiotics in the preceding 30 days.

Procedure—Cows were randomly assigned to receive a treatment of 1 ml (300,000 units) procaine penicillin G by bulbar subconjunctival injection or remain untreated. Composite milk samples were collected immediately before treatment and 4, 10, 16, 22, 28, and 40 hours after treatment. Milk samples were tested by use of a commercial test for β-lactam antibiotics.

Results—Among penicillin-treated cows, the first positive test results were observed 4 hours after treatment, and the last positive result was observed 22 hours after treatment. The percentages of positive test results before treatment and at 4, 10, 16, 22, 28, and 40 hours after treatment were 0, 9, 87, 42, 8, 0, and 0%, respectively. None of the untreated cows had positive test results for β-lactam antibiotics at any sampling time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Penicillin was detected in milk for up to 22 hours after a single subconjunctival injection of procaine penicillin G in cows. This result should be considered when recommending milk withholding periods following the administration of penicillin by this route in lactating dairy cows. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:369–371)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the feasibility of using a subconjunctivally implanted micro-osmotic pump for continuous delivery of medication to the eyes of horses-during a 7-day period.

Animals

4 healthy adult horses.

Procedure

With horses restrained in a standing position, micro-osmotic pumps were implanted sub-conjunctivally in each eye for 7 days. The treatment eye received an atropine-loaded micro-osmotic pump (100 μl of 1.5% atropine), and the contralateral eye received a sterile saline-loaded pump (100 μl of 0.9% NaCl) as a control treatment. Pupil size was measured at 12-hour intervals until values returned to baseline.

Results

The micro-osmotic pumps were tolerated and did not migrate or become dislodged. During the 7-day treatment period, pupils were significantly larger in the eyes implanted with atropine-loaded pumps, compared with saline-implanted control eyes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Micro-osmotic pumps were implanted and removed easily from standing horses and were not associated with complications during the 7-day treatment period. Therefore, subconjunctivally implanted micro-osmotic pumps can potentially be used when treating ophthalmic disease in horses. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1102-1105)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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an effective therapy for the treatment of ocular surface immune-mediated diseases such as IMMK in horses and stromal keratitis in humans. In a pilot study, 12 4 horses with equine IMMK received a subconjunctival injection of autologous BM-MSCs. In

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

were further assigned to 1 of 4 subgroups on the basis of administration of 2 treatments: subconjunctival administration of a corticosteroid 48 hours prior to inoculation and corneal microtrephination at the time of inoculation. Therefore, dogs in the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

anesthetized included ofloxacin solution l (0.2 mL injected subconjunctivally in the dorsotemporal bulbar conjunctiva as well as topically applied to the right eye), topical administration of autologous serum and triple antibiotic ointment m to the right eye

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dog's eyes were assessed for ophthalmic complications. Hyperemia, chemosis, subconjunctival hemorrhage, ophthalmic pruritus, tearing, and discharge were classified as absent, light, moderate, or intense; the behavior of these complications over the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

limited vision in the right eye. The cornea and intraocular structures were not visible in either eye. To provide plasminogen locally in both eyes, a single subconjunctival injection of FFP that had normal plasminogen activity (76%) followed by topical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association