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Abstract

A scoping review of published literature found 108 articles related to mesenchymal stem or stromal cell (MSC) use in cats. Twenty-four of the publications summarized the treatment of 192 cats with MSC products for 12 naturally occurring and induced diseases. These trials used a variety of cell sources, administration routes, delivery vehicles, and dosages. The majority of studies did not have a control group. The disease with the largest number of cats administered MSCs thus far is chronic kidney disease (n = 59 cats). The majority of cats had no adverse events associated with treatment, which supports continued interest in the potential use of MSC products to address unmet medical needs. Treatment outcomes of the 192 cats have ranged from no response to long-term cure, depending on the disease being treated and the particular study. Some of these early studies show promise and provide significant information to direct both the design and focus of larger clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of MSC treatment for veterinary and human applications.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Despite a pressing need for new therapies to address unmet veterinary medical need, no approved stem cell products are available for use in cats in the US. To evaluate the current state of mesenchymal stem or stromal cell (MSC) research in cats, a scoping review of published literature was performed, which identified 108 publications related to feline MSCs. Twenty-six of the articles described administration of MSC products to a total of 215 cats. Twelve of the studies included a control group. These experimental and clinical trials used 7 cell sources, 9 administration routes, 12 delivery vehicles, and a 300-fold range in dosages for initial studies in healthy cats and cats with 12 naturally occurring and induced diseases. The majority of studies administered 2 doses of allogeneic, adipose-derived MSC IV and monitored a median of 6.5 treated cats for a median of 90 days. The majority (150/215 [69.8%]) of cats had no reported adverse events associated with treatment. Although an increase in feline MSC publications in the past 10 years indicates progress, the wide variety and small number of studies using MSCs and MSC products in cats demonstrates that current evaluations are mostly still in the discovery phase, and several issues remain related to larger scale trials using MSC products in cats. The current available publications provide information to direct further clinical study development and informed owner consent for study enrollment.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association