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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

reducing the annual number of cats and dogs euthanized from approximately 13.5 million in 1973. 2 Spay-neuter clinics operate throughout the United States to reduce overpopulation and euthanasia of companion animals. 3 In targeted areas, programs for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, a recent publication 5 demonstrated that the issue is complex and health effects might also be partly dependent on the breed of dog and age at which the dog was spayed or neutered. Removal of the testes in males prevents the development of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the number of hours and sessions utilizing the provided spay and neuter simulation models and hours of previous spay and neuter experience under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian. The study was divided into 2 phases. Phase I encompassed a

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

cumulative incidence of 16% for AUI in spayed females but a low response rate for follow-up of 7%. It is possible that there may be regional differences in AUI rates between the United States and United Kingdom. Howe et al 6 evaluated complications of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Subsidized and reduced-cost spay-neuter programs to sterilize owned cats and dogs are central components of efforts to reduce the numbers of homeless and euthanized companion animals in the United States. However, data on the effect of these

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence is the most common cause of acquired urinary incontinence in spayed female dogs. 1 Among dogs, the prevalence of the disease in spayed females is higher than it is in sexually intact females. 2–5 Indeed

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Pyometra, a hormonally driven infection of the uterus caused by opportunistic bacteria, presents a significant health risk to intact female dogs and cats. 1 – 4 In countries where routine spaying is uncommon, around 19% of intact

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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Veterinarians who neuter cats and dogs sometimes find, for a variety of reasons, that they are required to spay pregnant animals. Ovariohysterectomy of pregnant animals in animal shelters and humane societies, for example, is commonly recommended

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association