Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 131 items for :

  • "soft tissue surgery" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

-fluconazole group would maintain adequate analgesia for 24 hours with 2 doses, compared with the 4 doses of standard formulation methadone, in clinical patients undergoing soft tissue surgery. Materials and Methods Animals The preliminary pharmacokinetic

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

B . Rabbit gastroenterology . Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract . 2005 ; 8 ( 2 ): 351 - 375 . doi: 10.1016/j.cvex.2005.01.007 19. Szabo Z , Bradley K , Cahalane AK . Rabbit soft tissue surgery . Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

://www.cdc.gov/nhsn/pdfs/pscmanual/9pscssicurrent.pdf 14. Espinel-Rupérez J , Martín-Ríos MD , Salazar V , Baquero-Artigao MR , Ortiz-Díez G . Incidence of surgical site infection in dogs undergoing soft tissue surgery: risk factors and economic impact . Vet Rec

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the difference in histologic artifacts and morphologic diagnosis among 3 laparoscopic cup biopsy forceps techniques and wedge hepatic samples.

ANIMALS

Cadavers of 20 client-owned dogs following euthanasia for unrelated reasons between January 3 and July 29, 2021.

PROCEDURES

Four biopsy techniques were performed from the margin of 3 liver lobes/dog. Laparoscopic techniques used 5-mm cup biopsy forceps to obtain biopsy samples by pulling the forceps forcefully caudally to free a sample (the PULL technique), rotating the forceps 360° in 1 direction until freed (the TWST technique), or pulling the forceps through a 5-mm cannula to remove the sample (the CAN technique); wedge biopsy samples served as the control (CON). Data collected included sample weight, histologic features, diagnosis, and artifact characterization. Gwet AC1 or intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to detect agreement among techniques.

RESULTS

Sample weights for CON and TWST were significantly larger (P < .001 and P = .035, respectively) than for PULL and CAN. There was excellent agreement among all techniques for most diagnostic features (Gwet AC1, 0.93 to 1). The TWST technique resulted in the best overall artifact profile for laparoscopic techniques, with 90% of samples (54/60) having crisp edges and 65% of samples (39/60) having no or mild tearing. The agreement was moderate to good (ICC, 0.73 for edges and 0.76 for tearing) among all cup biopsy forceps techniques.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The TWST technique resulted in the largest sample and had the fewest artifacts, supporting its continued use during laparoscopic procedures.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the feasibility and describe the relevant differences between robotic cholecystectomy (RC) and laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a canine model.

SAMPLE

Canine cadavers (n = 4) weighing between 30 and 42 kg.

METHODS

Dogs were positioned in dorsal recumbency. A surgical robot was used to perform the RC and was placed at the cranial aspect of the surgical table. One 12-mm and 3 8-mm robotic ports and 1 5-mm laparoscopic port were placed as needed to perform the RC. The specific steps of the procedure were described and timed. Perceived differences between psychomotor skills between robotics and laparoscopy were noted.

RESULTS

RC was successful in all dogs, but minor intraoperative complications did occur during the manipulation of the gallbladder in 1 dog. The median length of time for ports to be appropriately docked was 19.5 minutes, and the median procedure time was 119.5 minutes. Psychomotor skills specific to robotics can be learned during this procedure.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Robotic cholecystectomy is feasible. RC allowed for experience with the different psychomotor skills utilized with robotic instrumentation and may be an appropriate training procedure for veterinary surgeons wishing to gain basic experience with robotic instrumentation.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report perioperative complications and client-perceived outcome following laparoscopic surgical treatment for sliding hiatal hernia (SHH) in dogs.

ANIMALS

Client-owned dogs (n = 9).

METHODS

Medical records were reviewed and perioperative data collected including preoperative diagnostic imaging, operative details, complications, and need for conversion to open celiotomy. A single-incision, multicannulated port was inserted in the subumbilical region followed by placement of an additional 2 or 3 instrument portals. Hiatal plication, esophagopexy, and left-sided gastropexy were performed laparoscopically. Follow-up information was collected with telephone interview with the owners and/or referring veterinarian. A standardized questionnaire was completed by dog owners postoperatively.

RESULTS

Intraoperative pneumothorax occurred in 5 of 9 (55.6%) dogs and resulted in conversion to open celiotomy in 2 (22.2%) dogs. In 4 dogs, pneumothorax was suspected to be the result of progressive leakage of capnoperitoneum through the suture bite holes of the esophageal hiatal plication sutures. Hiatal plication was performed using intracorporeal simple interrupted sutures (n = 4) or a simple continuous pattern with barbed suture (4). Esophagopexy was performed using barbed suture in all dogs. Gastropexy was performed using a total laparoscopic technique (n = 4) or laparoscopic-assisted technique (3). Using a standardized questionnaire, dog owners perceived a postoperative improvement in regurgitation after eating and regurgitation after excitement/increased activity.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Laparoscopic treatment of SHH resulted in owner-perceived improvement in clinical signs. Intraoperative pneumothorax occurred in a high proportion of dogs but did not result in long-term sequelae.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

adjusted for the effects of other associated variables, forward stepwise logistic regression was performed. The final multivariable model ( Table 3 ) included the following variables: incision length > 10 cm, soft tissue surgery service, and anesthesia

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To establish interval level measurement in a prototype composite measure pain scale (CMPS) for assessment of acute pain in dogs and to investigate the scale's validity.

Animals—20 clinically normal dogs, 20 dogs with medical conditions, and 117 dogs undergoing surgery.

Procedure—First, a scaling model was applied to the CMPS descriptors to establish weights for each and create a continuous scale. Subsequently, 5 observers independently used the scale to score signs of pain in 4 groups of dogs (control dogs, dogs with medical conditions, and 40 dogs undergoing soft tissue or orthopedic surgery). Scores from each group and from groups of conditions perceived to cause no, mild, moderate, and severe pain were compared. In addition, the scale was applied to 77 dogs undergoing orthopedic or soft tissue surgery and scores were compared with simultaneously derived numeric rating scale (NRS) scores; comparisons were made between surgical groups and with time after surgery.

Results—Calculated scale descriptor weights ranged from –2.0 to 2.0 and were transformed to create a continuous scale from 0 to 10. Median CMPS scores differed significantly among the 4 study groups and among pain severity groups and were typically greater with increasing perceived pain severity. Agreement was determined between CMPS and NRS scores, and there was a significant and expected time effect and difference between the CMPS scores of dogs undergoing orthopedic and soft tissue surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that this interval level measurement scale is a valid measure of acute pain in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:2154–2166)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

different. Table 1— Comparison of incidence and selected potential risk factors for PORV in 2 canine patient cohorts (n = 244) undergoing nonelective neurologic, orthopedic, and soft tissue surgery during the first 3 months (January to March) of 2000

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association