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-eared slider turtles 8 and bearded dragons 9 or thermal thresholds in green iguanas. 10 Morphine, a μ-opioid receptor agonist, increases thermal withdrawal latencies in turtles 8 and bearded dragons 9 at doses ranging between 1.5 and 20 mg/kg (0.68 and 9

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

) or 48.0 hours (cloacal). Materials and Methods Animals The study protocol was approved by the University of Illinois Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (Protocol #21231). Sixteen slider turtles ( T. scripta ) of undescribed sex were

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

for pain be disregarded at any time. Morphine, which is primarily an MOR agonist (with DOR and KOR activities), induces antinociception in redeared slider turtles during exposure to a noxious thermal stimulus. 4 In contrast, butorphanol, which is

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the study reported here was to determine whether red-eared slider turtles ( Trachemys scripta elegans ) exposed to UV-B radiation under controlled conditions would have increased concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 concentrations, compared with

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

,13 donkeys, 13 sheep, 14,15 goats, 14,16,17 cattle, 18,19 dogs, 20,21 , a vultures, 22 green iguanas, 23 cats, 24,25 piglets, 26 , a camels, 27 llamas, 28 and rabbits. 29–31 Because no data are available for red-eared slider turtles ( Trachemys

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

(vertical vs horizontal) and extremity and neck position (extended vs withdrawn) on ventilated lung volume measured via CT in conscious and sedated male and female red-eared slider turtles ( Trachemys scripta elegans ). We hypothesized that these variables

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In the report “Pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in red-eared slider turtles ( Trachemys scripta elegans ) after single intravenous and intramuscular injections” ( Am J Vet Res 2016;77:439–444), the address provided for Drs. Uney and Dik is incorrect

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

respiratory depression in conscious red-eared slider turtles. The study was undertaken to determine whether butorphanol or morphine (at low and high doses) provides antinociception (determined by use of the thermal hind limb withdrawal latency test) and assess

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a combination of 2 nonantibiotic microbicide compounds, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), as a treatment to suppress or eliminate Salmonella spp from red-eared slider (RES) turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) eggs and hatchlings.

Sample Population—2,738 eggs from 8 turtle farms in Louisiana.

Procedures—Eggs were randomly sorted into 3 or, when sufficient eggs were available, 4 treatment groups as follows: control, pressure-differential egg treatment with NaOCl and gentamicin, NaOCl and PHMB bath treatment, and pressure-differential egg treatment with NaOCl and PHMB. Bacterial cultures were performed from specimens of eggs and hatchlings and evaluated for Salmonella spp.

Results—RES turtle eggs treated with NaOCl and PHMB as a bath (odds ratio [OR], 0.2 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.1 to 0.3]) or as a pressure-differential dip (OR, 0.01 [95% CI, 0.001 to 0.07]) or with gentamicin as a pressure-differential dip (OR, 0.1 [95% CI, 0.06 to 0.2]) were significantly less likely to have Salmonella-positive culture results than control-group eggs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Concern over reptile-associated salmonellosis in children in the United States is so great that federal regulations prohibit the sale of turtles that are < 10.2 cm in length. Currently, turtle farms treat eggs with gentamicin solution. Although this has reduced Salmonella shedding, it has also resulted in antimicrobial resistance. Results of our study indicate that a combination of NaOCl and PHMB may be used to suppress or eliminate Salmonella spp on RES turtle eggs and in hatchlings.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate and compare the pharmacokinetic parameters of SC ceftazidime administered at 20 and 40 mg/kg to red-eared sliders.

ANIMALS

8 adult red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans).

METHODS

In a sequential, 2-period study with a 3-week washout period between treatments, ceftazidime was administered SC to turtles at 20 and 40 mg/kg. Blood samples were collected from the subcarapacial sinus at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after ceftazidime administration. Plasma ceftazidime concentrations were quantified using reversed-phase HPLC.

RESULTS

Mean plasma half-life after 20- and 40-mg/kg dosing was 39.75 ± 8.0 hours and 33.03 ± 6.56 hours, respectively. Mean maximum plasma concentration after 20- and 40-mg/kg dosing was 71.0 ± 15.93 µg/mL and 120.0 ± 30.62 µg/mL, respectively. Mean plasma ceftazidime concentrations remained ≥ 8 µg/mL, the theoretical MIC for various reptile pathogens for all time points.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicate that ceftazidime dosed at either 20 or 40 mg/kg produces plasma concentrations exceeding the theoretical MIC of various reptile pathogens for at least 120 hours. An ideal dosing interval could not be determined, as all plasma concentrations remained above the threshold of interest for all time points. Follow-up studies should focus on establishing a dosing interval and more rigorous monitoring for potential adverse effects.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research