Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 85 items for :

  • "sinusitis" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

E quine sinonasal disorders have been described in horses since the late 19th century. 1 Sinusitis in horses can sometimes be a challenge to treat in the case of chronic clinical signs. Recent studies 2 , 3 have shown the benefits of CT as a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Although any of the 6 paranasal sinuses (frontal, maxillary, palatine, lacrimal, sphenoid, and conchal sinuses) in cattle can be affected by sinusitis, the frontal and maxillary sinuses are the primary ones clinically affected by infectious

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Chronic frontal sinusitis in 12 dairy cattle most often was associated with a history of dehorning, in which the sinus was entered (67%), or with respiratory tract disease (25%). The most common organisms isolated were Actinomyces pyogenes and Pasteurella multocida. Signs of infection did not develop for months in some cattle and were often intermittent. The most common clinical signs included anorexia, lethargy, fever, frontal bone distortion, exophthalmos, abnormal posture, nasal discharge, and neurologic abnormalities.

Treatment consisted of trephination at 2 sites, drainage and lavage of the sinus cavity, and administration of antibiotics and analgesics. Eight cattle responded well to treatment and were discharged, but 4 others had signs of cns involvement and died or were euthanatized.

Trephination of the frontal sinus cavity at carefully chosen sites and antibiotic treatment are indicated when sinusitis is suspected. Drainage of the sinus cavity is imperative to avoid extension of the infection into the cns.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Sinus osteotomy is currently performed in equine surgery with conventional surgical methods, such as trephines and oscillating bone saw, leading to subsequent trauma to the bone during cutting. Piezoelectric devices are now used in maxillofacial surgery in humans as a standard tool as it is less traumatic than the oscillating bone saw and shortens the healing period. The aim of this study was to show that the piezoelectric device can be used for equine sinus surgery, compare its use with the oscillating bone saw, and describe the outcome of cases involving osteotomy performed with a piezoelectric surgical device.

ANIMALS

10 horse specimens for cadaveric study and 11 client-owned equines for clinical evaluation.

METHODS

Each cadaveric head underwent a frontonasal bone flap on a randomly assigned side with the piezotome and the oscillating bone saw on the opposite side. Surgical time was recorded for every procedure, and gross examination was performed. A Welch t test was used to compare the surgical time between piezoelectric and oscillating saw use. For the clinical study, animals presented for sinonasal surgery at the hospital from March through October 2023 were included.

RESULTS

Osteotomy was possible with the piezotome in all animals. Surgical time was significantly increased when using the piezotome in comparison with the oscillating saw (P < .05). All clinical patients were treated adequately for the sinonasal disorder they were presented for using the piezotome instead of the oscillating saw. No adverse effects nor long-term complications related to its use have been noted, and preservation of the surrounding soft tissues was evident.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The use of a piezoelectric device in equine surgery is feasible. However, the cadaveric study showed an increased surgical time to perform a frontonasal bone flap.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-sided atrophic rhinitis and maxillary sinusitis with fluid accumulation and irregular mineralization in the dorsal and ventral recesses of the left maxillary sinus and osteolysis of the rostral part of the left maxillary bone ( Figure 1 ). No abnormalities of the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-old French Bulldog that was evaluated because of lethargy, anorexia, and chronic rhinitis-sinusitis and that had undergone dorsal rhinotomies 3 months and 2 weeks earlier. Notice the intraventricular pneumocephalus with dilatation of the left lateral

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In horses, sinusitis is the most frequent disorder of the paranasal sinuses. 1 Possible causes include infections of the upper respiratory tract (primary sinusitis), dental disease, facial trauma, sinus cysts, progressive ethmoid hematoma

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, respectively (arrowheads), with moderate periapical sclerosis and widening of the periodontal spaces (arrows). The left rostral and caudal maxillary sinuses and ventral conchal sinus are filled with fluid, indicative of sinusitis (asterisks). L = Left. R

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

lymphoplasmacytic sinusitis with intralesional fungal hyphae ( Figure 2 ). Six weeks later, the discharge was reported to be intermittent, bilateral, and clear. Four months after sinusotomy, the dog was reexamined because of a 1-week history of bilateral

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association