Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 839 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

S inonasal disorders are common in horses of all ages. To adequately diagnose and treat sinus disease, open access to the paranasal sinuses is often needed. Currently, minimally invasive access to sinuses is preferred, but larger osteoplastic

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the development of screening or diagnostic tests. The objective of the present study was to determine whether there was an association between small frontal sinuses and syringohydromyelia in smallbreed dogs that underwent MRI during a 20-month interval

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

prior to admission, and upon examination, the left frontal bone protruded 2 to 3 cm in 1 area. A radiopaque mass involving the left paranasal sinuses was evident on radiographs obtained by the referring veterinarian. On initial examination at

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-sided atrophic rhinitis and maxillary sinusitis with fluid accumulation and irregular mineralization in the dorsal and ventral recesses of the left maxillary sinus and osteolysis of the rostral part of the left maxillary bone ( Figure 1 ). No abnormalities of the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cumbersome catheterization protocols reduce the practicality of this method. However, the supravertebral sinus has been described as a safe and practical route for drugs that require IV administration. 12 The purpose of the study reported here was to

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

is recommended. In most instances, topical treatment with clotrimazole has been associated with only minor complications. 2 Dogs with fungal granulomas within the frontal sinuses are often refractory to treatment and may require debridement followed

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

The condition of perianal sinuses (also known as anal furunculosis, perianal fistulae, pararectal fistulae, anusitis, or fistulae-in-ano) is an insidiously progressive, chronic inflammatory disease of the perianal and perirectal tissues in dogs

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

from the pars distalis and POMC-derived peptides from the pars intermedia are secreted into the secondary plexus of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal portal system and subsequently flow into the cavernous sinus that lines the hypophyseal fossa of the sella

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Figure 1— Three-dimensional CT reconstruction of a lateralized occipital MLO lesion in a 6-year-old mixed-breed dog (dog 1). The lesion affected the right side of the occiput. For this dog, MRI revealed that the right transverse sinus was obstructed by

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

parameter linked to cardiac output. For instance, the effect of premature beats on cardiac output and ventricular filling depends on the coupling interval between sinus and ectopic beats and the instantaneous heart rate. In some cases, the interval of

Open access