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sequestrum, there was a focal, ill-defined region of subchondral demineralization that was identified on CT and radiographs. Further changes associated with persistent, septic osteoarthritis of the TMT joint were noted, including regionally extensive

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

metacarpal bone with a suspected medial cortical sequestrum ( Figure 1 ). The adjacent physis was radiographically normal. Given the absence of a history of trauma and high degree of suspicion for inadequate passive transfer of immunity, hematogenous

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

granulation tissue and diffuse corneal edema. Mild corneal malacia medial (left) to the plaque and mucopurulent discharge are present. The plaque was subsequently diagnosed as a corneal sequestrum on the basis of histologic findings that included denatured

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Protein concentration was determined, using the Bradford technique, in tears from cats with normal corneas and from cats with corneal sequestrum. Tears from the former group contained 5.81 ± 2.29 mg of protein/ml; those from corneal sequestrum-affected cats contained 6.21 ± 2.21 mg/ml. Difference between the 2 values was not significant. Molecular weight determination was made, using 4 to 20% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Molecular mass of proteins ranged from 263 to 14 kDa. There was no detectable difference in the band patterns for the 2 groups.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

%) llama with a femoral sequestrum, and focal alopecia in 1 (3%) llama. Fecal examination showed the camelids with loose feces had intestinal parasitism. Etiology —Only 7 of 36 (19%) camelids (5 sexually intact males, 1 castrated male, and 1 female) had a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

sequestrum (25 cases), repeated gingival failure (3 cases), repeated paranasal cavity infection (4 cases), infection of new tooth substance (3 cases), and mandibular fracture (2 cases). From these rabbits, gingival suture was performed again in 3 cases, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare mean healing times after debridement, debridement with grid keratotomy, and superficial keratectomy in cats with nonhealing corneal ulcers.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—29 cats with 36 nonhealing corneal ulcers.

Procedure—Medical records of cats with nonhealing corneal ulcers were reviewed. Signalment, duration of clinical signs, ophthalmic abnormalities, and response to various treatment protocols were recorded.

Results—Mean age of affected cats was 7 years, 8 months. Affected breeds included domestic shorthair (17 cats), Persian (9), Himalayan (2), and Siamese (1). Clinical signs were evident for approximately 2 weeks prior to referral. Both eyes were affected in 4 cats. Mean healing time of ulcers treated with superficial debridement was 30 days. Mean healing time of ulcers treated with superficial debridement and grid keratotomy was 42 days. Superficial keratectomy was performed on 2 eyes and resulted in a healing time of 2 weeks. Formation of a corneal sequestrum was evident in 2 of 21 eyes treated with superficial debridement. Formation of a corneal sequestrum was evident in 4 of 13 eyes treated with superficial debridement and grid keratotomy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Brachycephalic cats appear to be predisposed to developing nonhealing corneal ulcers. The combination of superficial debridement and grid keratotomy did not decrease mean healing time of nonhealing ulcers, compared with superficial debridement alone. Grid keratotomy may predispose cats with corneal ulcers to develop a corneal sequestrum. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:733–735)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine risk factors for development of sequestra in cattle and identify factors associated with a successful outcome.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—110 cattle.

Procedure—Medical records of cattle treated at veterinary teaching hospitals in North America were reviewed. To determine risk factors for osseous sequestration, breed, age, and sex of cattle with osseous sequestration were compared with breed, age, and sex of all other cattle admitted during the study period.

Results—110 cattle were included in the study. Three had 2 sequestra; thus, 113 lesions were identified. Most sequestra were associated with the bones of the extremities, most commonly the third metacarpal or third metatarsal bone. Ninety-two animals were treated surgically (ie, sequestrectomy), 7 were treated medically, 3 were initially treated medically and were then treated surgically, and 8 were not treated. Follow-up information was available for 65 animals treated surgically and 6 animals treated medically. Fifty-one (78%) animals treated surgically and 5 animals treated medically had a successful outcome. Cattle that were 6 months to 2 years old had a significantly increased risk of developing a sequestrum, compared with cattle < 6 months old. Cattle in which sequestrectomy was performed with the aid of local anesthesia were significantly more likely to undergo 2 or more surgical procedures than were cattle in which sequestrectomy was performed with the aid of general anesthesia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that sequestrectomy will result in a successful outcome for most cattle with osseous sequestration. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:376–383)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association