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-old Appaloosa mare with a 6 X 3-cm laceration to the lateral aspect of the right fourth metatarsal bone (MT4). Fluid analysis and cytology of the TMT joint confirmed septic neutrophilic inflammation, with the presence of intracellular and extracellular

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

important being leakage of ingesta at the surgical site resulting in postoperative septic peritonitis. Factors associated with leakage or survival following gastrointestinal surgery in dogs have been reported. 1–4 Dogs and cats undergoing multiple

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

contamination during surgery. 2,3 Postarthroscopy septic arthritis rates ranging from 0.01% to 0.5% have been reported in humans, 3 but information on the prevalence of septic arthritis developing after arthroscopic procedures in horses is sparse. Because of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

core lesion suggested that the lesion was due to a septic inflammatory process. In addition, the improvement in lameness seen with systemic treatment with florfenicol prior to the initial evaluation also suggested that sepsis was a key component of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Pedal osteitis is an inflammatory condition that results in demineralization of the distal phalanx. 1 Two classifications of pedal osteitis are recognized: septic and nonseptic. 2 Purulent discharge originating from the distal phalanx, with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

localized proximal to the foot. 4 Septic arthritis is the most common joint disease of cattle. 5 The incidence of septic arthritis was 0.11 cases/1,000 calf-days at risk in a longitudinal study 6 of veal calves in Belgium and 0.002 cases/calf-month in a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

capsule or tendon sheath. 1,4–7 Chronic lameness or debilitation, sometimes necessitating euthanasia, are potential sequelae if synovial infections are not prevented or appropriately treated. Treatments for septic arthritis and tenosynovitis include

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Synovial sepsis is not an uncommon occurrence in the equine population, particularly resulting from trauma or wounds involving a joint or tendon sheath. 6 Septic bicipital bursitis is reported more commonly following trauma 1 , 7 , 8 or via hematogenous

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Intrasynovial infection causes severe, debilitating lameness in horses. 1,2 The lowest reported estimates of mortality rates are 8% in adults 3 and 22% in foals. 4 Most commonly, septic synovitis occurs within a joint 1 ; however, septic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Septic tenosynovitis in horses may result in euthanasia or death, and horses that do survive may not be able to return to their previous level of function. Reasons for a poor outcome in horses with septic tenosynovitis include development of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association