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available for veterinary use, including carprofen, firocoxib, ketoprofen, and meloxicam. 10 A new NSAID available for veterinary use is robenacoxib (Onsior; Elanco Inc), which was originally developed for the control of inflammation, pain, and hyperthermia

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Robenacoxib is an NSAID used for the management of pain and inflammation in cats and dogs. In the United States, tablets of robenacoxib are the only approved formulation for cats. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

robenacoxib) are approved by the FDA for use in cats. Meloxicam is approved for administration by a single SC injection. Robenacoxib is a fairly new NSAID that acts primarily by selective COX-2 inhibition (ie, selective COX-2 inhibitor) and is approved for

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

in all tissues. 8,9 The coxibs are a group of NSAIDs that selectively inhibit the COX-2 isoform and include robenacoxib. 10 The relative COX-2 selectivity of the coxibs is due to differences in binding between the drug and COX-1 and COX-2. Binding

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

drug classes. Robenacoxib is a novel highly selective inhibitor of COX-2. 16 In rats, robenacoxib exerts the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic actions characteristic of NSAIDs, while possessing a much wider safety margin for

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

or weeks after surgery. Furthermore, there are reports 3,4 that NSAIDs are more effective than are opioids for relief of surgery-related pain. Robenacoxib is an NSAID with some properties (most notably, a fast onset of action and a high safety

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. The objective of the study reported here was to determine whether incubation of canine cruciate ligament cells with 1 of 4 NSAIDS (acetylsalicylic acid, carprofen, meloxicam, or robenacoxib) would affect apoptosis of those cells when they were

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

evaluation of sodium urate-induced lameness. Additionally, investigations that involved the use of deracoxib, 13 firocoxib, 11,12 meloxicam, 8 and robenacoxib 15 also have detected early and consistent attenuation of lameness attributable to urate

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

population. Additionally, previous studies have investigated the incidence of treatment failure of traditional NSAIDs using GCPS-SF. Friton et al 15 assessed the clinical efficacy of preoperative administration of robenacoxib compared to placebo. Treatment

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

unknown, SC, once), robenacoxib (2 mg/kg [0.9 mg/lb], SC, once and PO, q 24 h for the following 2 days), and amoxicillin–clavulanic acid (15.3 mg/kg [7.0 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h for 10 days). The drains were removed, and a second debridement with closure of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association