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a method that is recommended by the Reproductive Management Group of the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria. In nonhuman primates, progestagens normally do not interfere with parturition. Additionally, etonogestrel is considered safe for

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

A program involving greater veterinary participation in detection of estrus and artificial insemination of cattle was evaluated in a 700-cow dairy herd from January 1987 through August 1988. Previous reproductive performance was below normal. First-service pregnancy rate from artificial insemination was 42%, and mean number of nonpregnant days for the cows was 120.

Between postpartum days 55 and 62, all cows with functional corpus luteum assessed by rectal palpation were administered prostaglandin each Monday morning. Return visits were made to the herd each Thursday and Friday to observe cows and to inseminate those in estrus. On the other 5 days of the week, the owner or his employees inseminated all cows in estrus. The first-service pregnancy rate for 842 cows observed in estrus and inseminated by the veterinarian was 59%. The pregnancy rate for cows inseminated by the owner and his employees increased from 42% to 50%. The mean number of nonpregnant days for all 700 cows decreased from 120 to 98 days, resulting in approximately $46,000 of increased income for the dairyman or approximately a 4 to 1 return on investment in veterinary service.

Results indicate that veterinarians could improve herd reproductive performance and solve chronic herd breeding problems by more actively participating with their clients in estrus detection and artificial insemination programs in cattle. The program allows practicing veterinarians an opportunity to observe cows for estrous behavior, establish their own pregnancy rate data, demonstrate to owners the importance of observing primary signs of estrus, and teach expert artificial insemination techniques.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

aid future clinicians in reproductive management of these species. Materials and Methods Prior to surgery, females were kept separate from males in a series of variably sized off-exhibit or quarantine holding systems at a large display aquaria

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To evaluate the association of herd demographics, parturition variables, stocking rate, and rotational grazing practices with the probability of fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium parvum from beef cow-calf herds in California.

Design

Cross-sectional study.

Sample Population

38 beef cow-calf operations.

Procedure

Fecal specimens were collected and examined for C parvum oocysts, using immunofluorescent microscopy. Association between various demographic and management factors and the probability of shedding C parvum were statistically evaluated.

Results

Adjusted for age and month of collection of a fecal sample, cattle from herds with a high number of young calves (≤ 2 months old) on the day of sample collection, a high stocking rate (No. of cattle/acre/mo), or a longer calving season were more likely to shed C parvum oocysts, compared with cattle from herds with fewer young calves, a lower stocking rate, or a shorter calving season. Cattle from herds with a higher number of older calves (> 2 months old) on the day of sample collection were less likely to shed C parvum oocysts, compared with cattle from herds with fewer older calves. Using our multivariate model, rotational grazing systems or season of onset of calving were not associated with shedding status for C parvum oocysts.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Reproductive management that would result in a shorter calving season and use of a lower stocking rate for cattle may be associated with reduced risk of C parvum shedding. Intensive rotational grazing systems and time of year for onset of calving season apparently have little effect on reducing prevalence of oocyst shedding. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1833–1838)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, herd health, infectious diseases, the digestive and musculoskeletal systems, and reproductive management. Readers will appreciate the author's straightforward style of prose and the use of numerous photographs and illustrations. The bulleted summaries

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

; 1263 – 1316 . 9. Dailey RA . Abortion in dairy cows and heifers. Dairy integrated reproductive management . West Virginia University . Available at: www.wvu.edu/∼Agexten/forglvst/Dairy/dirm24.pdf . Accessed Apr 10, 2010.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Determination of fetal sex in utero is useful for management decisions of dairy or meat goats as well as for commercialization of fetuses of a certain sex. 10 The development of integrated reproductive management systems that combine ultrasonography with other

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

times after insemination. Although pregnancy diagnosis can provide an important benefit for reproductive management of a dairy herd, small changes in accuracy and timing of pregnancy diagnosis can also result in substantial economic losses. a To our

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Because bright-field microscopy is often more readily available in clinical situations, use of Coomassie blue stain for detection of the acrosome of equine and canine spermatozoa may be a useful tool in reproductive management of these 2 species. In the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-of-a-kind clinical handbook that is well worth the price and should be on the shelf of any veterinarian, veterinary student, or breeder who is involved or interested in the reproductive management of dogs. Reviewed by Noel Thomas, DVM, DABVP, DACT Westside Vet

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association