Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,159 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

is the potential association between pancreatitis and an increased prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Chronic kidney disease in cats is defined and staged via serum creatinine levels using the International Renal Interest Society (IRIS

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The renal collecting system varies among domestic mammals. The renal pelvis as a common cavity around the renal crest in dogs, cats, sheep, and goats. 1 In horses, the renal pelvis is a comparatively small central space with 2 terminal recesses

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Acute renal failure is a sudden decrease in renal function characterized by inability to regulate fluid, electrolytes, and acid-base balance. 1 Acute azotemia can be characterized as prerenal, intrinsic renal, or postrenal in origin. Prerenal

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Radiography and ultrasonography are routinely used in veterinary medicine to evaluate the kidneys. In dogs, renal size is routinely measured by radiography and ultrasonography; because of the wide variation in patient sizes, kidney lengths are

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

highdose chemotherapy and those with septicemia and cerebrovascular disease. 14 The potential for patients with renal failure to have a high serum cardiac troponin concentration without primary cardiac disease that requires clinical intervention is

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Idiopathic renal hematuria, or benign essential renal hematuria, is a rare condition of chronic severe upper urinary tract bleeding. This condition typically results in gross hematuria that is not associated with trauma, stone disease, neoplasia

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In humans and other animals that undergo renal transplantation, the development of hypertension is common. 1–3 In a study 1 of 1,666 human renal transplant recipients, only 3.5% were normotensive without medication at 1 year after

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Renal transplantation is an established treatment for end-stage renal disease in cats. 1 Cats that have decompensated renal disease and are free from systemic disease, such as neoplasia and diabetes mellitus, are considered to be candidates for

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Perioperative hypertension has been reported for people 1 and cats 2,3 during and immediately after renal transplantation. In people, increased postperfusion systolic blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of acute graft rejection

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Renal transplantation has been a treatment option for cats with chronic renal disease since the first surgery was performed in 1987 and remains the only potential cure. 1 To prevent allograft rejection following the procedure

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association