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diagnostic performance when urine samples had been refrigerated for up to 24 hours. We hypothesized, under these conditions, the positive and negative RIA results would correlate well with positive and negative bacterial cultures, at all time points, and the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

plasma is prepared from whole blood as usual but is then stored refrigerated rather than frozen. Veterinarians may desire to store plasma as LP so it can be immediately administered for hemostatic resuscitation, similar to its use by physicians

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives

To examine stability of -glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity in stored serum from neonatal calves.

Animals

10 commercial beef calves between 36 and 60 hours old.

Procedure

Serum samples were obtained from the calves, and each sample was divided into 8 aliquots. Serum GGT activity was measured on day 0 (fresh) and days 1, 2, 3, and 4 of refrigerated storage (4 C) and weeks 1, 2, and 3 of frozen storage (−20 C).

Results

Serum GGT activities for each of the refrigerated aliquots did not significantly differ from day zero, with serum GGT activity (expressed as a percentage of initial activity) > 99% on all 4 days. Serum GGT activity in frozen aliquots decreased significantly after 1 and 2 weeks of frozen storage, 97 and 98%, respectively; however, this decrease in GGT activity was not biologically significant. The observed GGT activity did not decrease significantly in the samples stored frozen for 3 weeks; these samples retained 99% of initial activity.

Conclusion

The observed stability of serum GGT activity indicates that serum may be obtained, stored, and batch processed at a later time. This stability during storage is important to the success of a bovine passive transfer monitoring program based on GGT activity. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:354-355)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

immediately following inoculation; however, following storage for 24 hours, the samples yielded both false-negative (4%) and positive (50%) results. 5 The investigators suggested that false-negative results were possible for canine urine samples refrigerated

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. § Prepared for HPLC with unacidified diluent. Suspensions were originally prepared to contain 40 mg of voriconazole/mL. Room-temperature aliquots were collected immediately after suspension preparation, and refrigerated aliquots were collected approximately

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

(baseline) and after refrigerated storage for 20 to 28 hours (24-hour samples). Each box represents the interquartile (25th to 75th percentile) range, and the band across each box is the median. Whiskers represent the minimum and maximum values. The gray

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

evaluate the microbial integrity of preservative-free cyclodextrin-based alfaxalone in a multiple-use system over a 14-day period with 2 storage conditions (room temperature and refrigerated) and 3 handling techniques (CSTD, NCDP, and manufacturer

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

significant change in concentrations from baseline over time was identified for refrigerated samples, whereas cobalamin concentrations in samples stored with daylight exposure at room temperature decreased significantly from baseline over time (0.14%/h; 95

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

either on a diaper or in nonabsorbable litter increases over time. 3 The authors of previous studies 4–6 have recommended that urine samples be analyzed ≤ 30 minutes after collection or refrigerated and examined as soon as possible. Refrigerated samples

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

before drug screening is completed. Samples are refrigerated until drug testing is completed, and some samples could remain refrigerated for several weeks before genotypic testing. To our knowledge, successful PCR-based DNA typing of samples stored for a

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research