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Introduction Body temperature of the horse is routinely assessed by measurement of rectal temperature during physical examination. The normal reference range of rectal temperature in horses has been well established and is 37.5 to 38.3 °C. 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

perioperative setting. 25,26 Rectal temperature of rabbits can be affected by multiple factors; because a reference range has not been established, empirical values of 38.0° to 38.5°C (100.4° to 101.3°F) and 38.0° to 40.0°C (100.4° to 104°F) have been

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

–3 Clinically, rectal temperatures are typically obtained and generally considered to be representative of core body temperature. Investigators of 1 study 4 in humans found that rectal temperature measurement was less accurate than oral or tympanic thermometry

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To determine resting rectal temperatures of Vietnamese potbellied pigs.

Design

Prospective clinical trial.

Animals

85 potbellied pigs on a single farm and 27 potbellied pigs examined at a veterinary teaching hospital for routine veterinary care.

Procedure

Rectal temperatures of the potbellied pigs on a farm were measured during the morning, afternoon, and evening. Rectal temperatures at the time of initial examination were obtained from medical records for the potbellied pigs examined at the hospital.

Results

Mean rectal temperatures for both groups of potbellied pigs were the same. Overall unadjusted mean ± SD rectal temperature was 37.6 ± 0.8 C (99.7 ± 1.5 F; range, 35.1 to 39.6 C [95.2 to 103.3 F]). However, diurnal variation in rectal temperature was found among the farm population of potbellied pigs. After adjustment for age and repeated sampling, rectal temperatures recorded during the morning were found to be significantly lower than temperatures recorded during the afternoon and evening (mean difference, 0.5 and 0.9 C [0.9 and 1.6 F], respectively), and rectal temperatures recorded during the afternoon were found to be significantly lower than temperatures recorded during the evening (mean difference, 0.4 C [0.7 F]). There was a significant inverse linear relationship between age and rectal temperature.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Rectal temperatures of Vietnamese potbellied pigs may be lower than the lower limit of the reference range reported for domestic pigs. Because of diurnal variation in rectal temperatures, it is important to compare temperatures obtained at the same time of day when assessing patients. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:342–344)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

discharge, lack of rumen fill, and anorexia. 2 Those clinical observations have low sensitivity and specificity for identification of calves with BRDC. 3,4 Rectal temperatures are routinely obtained for calves with signs of BRDC to improve diagnostic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

; thus, the results for dogs with a +ΔRT should be interpreted with caution until further studies investigating causes of increased rectal temperature during anesthesia are performed. In humans 18 to 40 years of age, normal body temperature is tightly

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

body temperature of dogs have not been reported. The objective of the study reported here was to compare the effects of MLK and FLK combinations administered as CRIs during and after procedures on postprocedure rectal temperature in dogs. Materials

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

infrared radiation emanating from the tympanic membrane, with conflicting results. 4 – 6 , 8 – 11 However, the consensus is that tympanic membrane and axillary temperatures should not be used interchangeably with rectal temperature in dogs and cats

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

evaluate prognostic indicators for all-cause mortality in zoological companion animal species including blood glucose and PCV in chelonians, 3 rectal temperature in guinea pigs, 4 and blood glucose, BUN, lactate, rectal temperature, and sodium in rabbits

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a full-body spandex garment would alter rectal temperatures of healthy dogs at rest in cool and warm environments.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—10 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Each dog was evaluated at a low (20° to 25°C [68° to 77°F]) or high (30° to 35°C [86° to 95°F]) ambient temperature while wearing or not wearing a commercially available whole-body spandex garment designed for dogs. Oxygen consumption was measured by placing dogs in a flow-through indirect calorimeter for 90 to 120 minutes. Rectal temperature was measured before dogs were placed in the calorimeter and after they were removed.

Results—Rectal temperature increased significantly more at the higher ambient temperature than at the lower temperature and when dogs were not wearing the garment than when they were wearing it. The specific rate of oxygen consumption was significantly higher at the lower ambient temperature than at the higher temperature.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that wearing a snug spandex body garment does not increase the possibility that dogs will overheat while in moderate ambient temperatures. Instead, wearing such a garment may enable dogs to better maintain body temperature during moderate heat loading. These results suggest that such garments might be used for purposes such as wound or suture protection without causing dogs to overheat. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:71–74)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association