Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 67 items for :

  • "reconstructive surgery" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

R econstructive surgery with local or subdermal plexus flaps, axial pattern flaps (APFs), or skin grafts is common in small animal patients. Gentle tissue handling and preservation of blood supply are key principles of reconstructive surgery. APFs

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

cytokines in stifle joints of dogs with CrCL rupture and MPL (at the time of reconstructive surgery) and in unaffected control stifle joints. In addition, a longitudinal study was initiated to monitor mRNA expression of cytokines before and up to 12 months

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of intraincisional bioactive glass on healing of sutured skin wounds in dogs.

Animals—9 purpose-bred mature female Beagles.

Procedure—3 small matched bilateral (treated vs control) full-thickness truncal skin incisions were made and sutured. Treated wounds received intraincisional particulate bioactive glass prior to closure. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging was used to assess percentage change in tissue perfusion 3 and 5 days after incision on 1 set of 2 matched wounds, and skin and subcutaneous tissue-cutaneous trunci breaking strength were assessed at 5 days. The other 2 sets of wounds were used for histologic evaluation at 5 and 21 days, respectively.

Results—Subjective signs of gross inflammatory reaction were not detected in treated or control wounds. At 5 days, median subcutaneous tissuecutaneous trunci breaking strength was significantly higher in treated wounds than in control wounds (188.75 vs 75.00 g). At 5 days, median scores were significantly higher for neutrophils (1 vs 0), macrophages (2 vs 1), and necrosis (1 vs 0) for treated wounds than for control wounds. At 21 days, median macrophage scores were significantly higher for treated wounds than for control wounds (2 vs1).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bioactive glass in soft tissues does not cause a gross inflammatory reaction but causes an increase in histologic signs of inflammation, which decreases with time. Bioactive glass has potential for increasing tissue strength. Increased subcutaneous breaking strength could be beneficial in treating wounds in which early healing strength is needed. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1149–1153)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether sustained release of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 from a gelatin hydrogel would enhance bone regeneration in critical-sized long-bone defects and overcome inhibitory effects of preoperative irradiation.

Animals—24 adult New Zealand White rabbits.

Procedure—Rabbits were allocated to 2 groups. Twelve rabbits received localized megavoltage radiation to the right ulna by use of a cobalt 60 teletherapy unit, and 12 rabbits received no irradiation. Then, a 1.5-cm defect was aseptically created in the right ulna of each rabbit. Gelatin hydrogel that contained 5 µg of adsorbed recombinant-human (rh) TGF-β1 was placed in the defect of 12 rabbits (6 irradiated and 6 nonirradiated), and the other 12 rabbits received hydrogel without rhTGF-β1. Rabbits were euthanatized 10 weeks after surgery. New bone formation within the defect was analyzed by use of nondecalcified histomorphometric methods. A 1-way ANOVA was used to compare differences among groups.

Results—New bone formation within the defect was significantly greater in TGF-β1–treated rabbits than in rabbits treated with hydrogel carrier alone. Local delivery of rhTGF-β1 via a hydrogel carrier in irradiated defects resulted in amounts of bone formation similar to those for nonirradiated defects treated by use of rhTGF-β1.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Local delivery of TGF-β1 by use of a hydrogel carrier appears to have therapeutic potential for enhancing bone formation in animals after radiation treatments.

Impact for Human Medicine—This technique may be of value for treating human patients at risk for delayed bone healing because of prior radiation therapy. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1039–1045)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

mandibular kinematics in dogs would be adversely affected (ie, significant deviation from the motions of the intact mandible) by unilateral segmental or bilateral rostral mandibulectomy. We further hypothesized that reconstructive surgery, which restores the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) into the CSF for the treatment of chronic spinal cord injury in dogs that had not responded by 1 month after decompressive surgery.

Animals—23 dogs.

Procedures—Dogs with paraplegia and loss of nociception in the pelvic limbs for at least 1 month after decompressive surgery were assigned to transplantation or control groups. Dogs in the transplantation group received BMSCs injected into the CSF 1 to 3 months after decompressive surgery. Dogs in the control group did not receive additional treatments. Improvements in gait, proprioceptive positioning, and nociception were evaluated by use of the Texas Spinal Cord Injury Scale for ≥ 6 months after BMSC transplantation.

Results—6 of 10 dogs in the transplantation group regained the ability to walk, whereas only 2 of 13 dogs in the control group regained the ability to walk. Scores for the Texas Spinal Cord Injury Scale in the transplantation group were significantly higher than scores in the control group at the endpoint of the study (6 months after BMSC transplantation or after decompressive surgery for the transplantation and control groups, respectively). Only 1 dog (transplantation group) recovered nociception. All dogs from both groups had fecal and urinary incontinence. No complications were observed in relation to BMSC transplantation.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Injection of BMSCs into the CSF caused no complications and could have beneficial effects on pelvic limb locomotion in dogs with chronic spinal cord injuries.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare methods for harvesting canine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and determine the biological properties of canine BMSCs at successive passages in vitro.

Sample—BMSCs collected from the femurs of 9 Beagles.

Procedures—A fibroblast assay was performed to compare 2 methods for harvesting BMSCs: the aspiration and perfusion method. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to evaluate the cell surface markers. Changes in proliferative activity were analyzed by examining radioactivity of hydrogen 3-thymidine. Cell senescence was studied via senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining, and differentiation properties (osteogenesis and adipogenesis) were estimated in association with passage.

Results—The aspiration method yielded significantly more fibroblasts than the perfusion method. The cells harvested by both methods gave positive results for CD44 and CD90 and negative results for CD34 and CD45. After induction, the cells had osteogenic and adipogenic phenotypes. The biological properties of BMSCs harvested by the aspiration method were estimated in association with passage. With increasing number of passages, the proliferative activity was reduced and the proportion of cells with senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining was increased. The capacity of differentiation was reduced at passage 3.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The aspiration method was superior for collection of BMSCs. In early passages, canine BMSCs had the proliferative activity and potential of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation, but this decreased with increased number of passages. Consideration of passage will be important to the success of any strategy that seeks to regenerate tissue though the use of BMSCs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 3-year-old 27-kg female spayed American Bulldog with severe burn injuries caused by a gasoline can explosion was evaluated.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The dog had extensive partial- and full-thickness burns with 50% of total body surface area affected. The burns involved the dorsum extending from the tail to approximately the 10th thoracic vertebra, left pelvic limb (involving 360° burns from the hip region to the tarsus), inguinal area bilaterally, right medial aspect of the thigh, and entire perineal region. Additional burns affected the margins of the pinnae and periocular regions, with severe corneal involvement bilaterally.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The dog was hospitalized in the hospital’s intensive care unit for 78 days. Case management involved provision of aggressive multimodal analgesia, systemic support, and a combination of novel debridement and reconstructive techniques. Debridement was facilitated by traditional surgical techniques in combination with maggot treatment. Reconstructive surgeries involved 6 staged procedures along with the use of novel treatments including applications of widespread acellular fish (cod) skin graft and autologous skin cell suspension.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The outcome for the dog of the present report highlighted the successful use of maggot treatment and applications of acellular cod skin and autologous skin cell suspension along with aggressive systemic management and long-term multimodal analgesia with debridement and wound reconstruction for management of severe burn injuries encompassing 50% of an animal’s total body surface area.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association