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mouth to allow eating, drinking, grooming, and survival. However, mandibular drift, malocclusion, and a recurrence of ankylosis may occur. 10 , 16 A TMJR prosthesis was developed to address the clinical ramifications of a TMJ loss in cats and dogs (US

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

,7 Several intra-articular ligament replacement and prosthetic techniques have been described for CCL rupture repair in cattle. 2,8–10 However, prosthesis or ligament failure, surgical site dehiscence, and septic arthritis are commonly associated with those

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) for treatment, with a rate of repeated surgery < 1%. However, some patients require adjunctive medical treatment for their entire life. 17 , 18 , 20 The use of a customized titanium prosthesis has been previously described in veterinary

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

laboratory for CAD-CAM of a customized 3-D–printed titanium prosthesis, including rostral and caudal fixation plates ( Figure 2 ). A prefabricated guide was also manufactured to assist in planning the site and direction of the mandibular osteotomies

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To develop a procedure for orbital exenteration and prosthesis placement in fish.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

5 cultured hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis X M chrysops) ranging from 30 to 50 cm in length.

Procedure

Exenteration was performed, using a dorsal approach in which blunt dissection was performed in the circumorbital sulcus. The orbit was then dried, and simple interrupted sutures were placed, leaving 2 suture loops within the orbit. The orbit was filled with polyvinylsiloxane, and a prosthetic glass eye was seated in the polyvinylsiloxane.

Results

All fish retained the prosthesis and had satisfactory cosmetic results at the end of the 8-week study period.

Clinical Implications

The increase in popularity of pet fish and abundance of valuable aquarium and show fish have led to heightened awareness of piscine ocular disease. Aquarium fish are often euthanatized because of disfiguring ocular problems. The technique described here for surgical exenteration and cosmetic orbital prosthesis placement in fish may extend the captive life of public display fish. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:603–606)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Cartilage retention strengths of laryngoplasty prostheses were compared in larynges of 2-, 3-, and 4-year-old horses, using doubled polyester and expanded polytetrafiuoroethylene prostheses. Bilateral laryngoplasties were performed on each of 15 (seven 2-year-old, two 3-year-old, and six 4-year-old) larynges, which were collected at an abbatoir. Prostheses were secured to a mechanical testing machine, and tension causing arytenoid cartilage abduction was applied, until total failure of the cartilage or prosthesis resulted. Tension caused cricoid cartilage failure in 1 specimen, and muscular process cartilage failure in the remainder. There was no significant effect of age, prosthetic material, or side of prosthesis placement on cartilage retention of the prostheses. Additionally, frequency of multiple load-displacement peaks, indicating partial muscular process failure, was not affected by age or prosthetic material variables.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective—

To determine the outcome of implantation of an intraocular silicone prosthesis ( isp) in the eyes of dogs and cats with intraocular neoplasia.

Design—

Retrospective case series.

Animals—

Eight dogs and 1 cat with histologically confirmed intraocular neoplasia.

Procedure—

Signalment, clinical signs before and after surgery, results of microscopic examination of eviscerated intraocular tissues, follow-up information, and necropsy findings, if available, were recorded for each animal.

Results—

Five dogs and 1 cat had primary intraocular neoplasms. Two of the dogs developed regrowth of the neoplasm around the isp 6 to 24 months after implantation, and the eyes were enucleated. The cat developed signs compatible with systemic metastasis 4 years after surgery and was euthanatized. Three dogs had multicentric or metastatic neoplasia involving the eye. Two of these dogs were euthanatized because of their systemic disease 1.5 to 7 months after isp implantation. The third dog is alive without evidence of regrowth 3 years after surgery.

Clinical Implications—

Intraocular neoplasia is not an absolute contraindication to isp implantation

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

surgical option was pursued. The owner consented to have the dog enrolled in a preliminary clinical study in which a prosthetic cervical disk was implanted after spinal cord decompression. The cervical prosthesis used was a titanium alloy version (Ti-6AI

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

panel A versus panel B, with the formula: cos θ = x/r. (Reprinted with the permission of The Ohio State University.) Prosthesis biomechanical testing The artificial ligament or toggle pin implant consisted of a rigid shaft, a flexible

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research