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Summary

Historical and physical signs associated with prostatic disease diagnosed in dogs over a 5.5-year period were defined. One hundred seventy-seven male dogs were determined to have prostatic abnormality. Of the 177 dogs, 87 were determined to have specific prostatic disease. The most common prostatic disease identified in this study was bacterial prostatitis, followed by prostatic cyst, prostatic adenocarcinoma, and benign hyperplasia. The most common prostatic disease identified in neutered dogs was prostatic adenocarcinoma. Mean age at onset of prostatic disease was 8.9 years; statistically significant difference was not observed between age at onset of the various types of prostatic disease identified. Doberman Pinscher was the most common breed with prostate disease. Twenty-nine percent of dogs with a specifically identifiable prostatic disease had signs of systemic illness, 41% had signs of lower urinary tract disease, 28% had signs of gastrointestinal tract abnormalities, and 13% had signs of locomotor difficulty.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

surrounding the utility of DRE has been done to assess its use as a screening tool for the diagnosis of subclinical prostatic disease, detection of perineal hernias in male dogs, and anal sac disease. 3 – 5 Compared to other parts of the standard physical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine whether dogs had prostatic disease, urinary incontinence, or urinary tract infection 1 year after partial prostatectomy to treat prostatic abscesses and cysts.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

20 male dogs with prostatic abscesses or cysts. Fifteen dogs had evidence of urinary tract infection. Only 8 dogs urinated normally; the remainder dribbled, had obstructions, or required medical treatment.

Procedure

Partial prostatectomy was performed on each dog. Sexually Intact dogs (n = 12) also were castrated.

Results

None of the dogs had return of prostatic cystic enlargement or clinical signs of prostatic disease during the first year after surgery. Two dogs were euthanatized within 1 year after surgery, with 1 dog having prostatic enlargement and adenocarcinoma and 1 dog having unrelated lymphosarcoma. Fifteen dogs were continent. The remaining 5 dogs urinated normally but had intermittent and minor incontinence. Eleven dogs had no signs of infection 1 year after surgery, 5 had pyuria or positive urine bacteriologic culture results, 2 did not have urinalysis performed, and 2 were euthanatized.

Clinical Implications

Dogs with severe prostatic abscesses or cysts and infections can be successfully treated by partial prostatectomy with an ultrasonic surgical aspirator and castration, resulting in long-term disease resolution. Although most dogs with severe prostatic disease do not urinate normally before surgery, nearly all dogs resume normal micturition after partial prostatectomy. Postoperative results of partial prostatectomy appear to be better than those of previous drainage techniques for treatment of prostatic cavitary disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:868–871)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Ejaculate, urine, urethral swab specimens, and ultrasonography-guided small-needle prostatic cyst aspiration and/or tissue core biopsy specimens were collected for bacteriologic culture from 25 dogs in which prostatic disease was suspected on the basis of history, clinical signs of disease, or results of physical examination. The prostate gland in each dog was examined ultrasonographically, and the tissue core biopsy specimens were examined histologically and bacteriologically.

Two methods were used to assess bacterial prostatitis. In 5 dogs (20%), bacteriologic culture results of paired urethral swab and ejaculate specimens differed from culture results of specimens obtained by needle aspiration of prostatic cyst fluid or tissue core biopsy.

The prostate gland in 17 dogs had 1 or more cystic, fluid-filled structures (0.5 to 4.0 cm in diameter). Ultrasonographic appearance of the prostate gland did not have obvious correlation with culture results from dogs of the study. Histologic results of prostatic tissue core biopsy specimens correlated well with culture results.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

combination. 1 , 3 Perineal hernias occur most commonly in mature sexually intact male dogs. 1 Proposed causes of the muscular pelvic diaphragm weakness are tenesmus associated with chronic prostatic disease or constipation, myopathy, rectal abnormalities

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

prevalence in adult large-breed dogs, 14% 10 ) and often are associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia or other prostatic disease. 11 Cysts may be classified as either retention or paraprostatic cysts. Paraprostatic cysts may be very large (up to 30 cm in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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tenesmus, trauma, hormonal factors, and prostatic disease. 2 Common complications of perineal hernias include herniation of pelvic or abdominal contents or rectal prolapse. 3 Although herniation of the urinary bladder is a commonly reported complication

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

ischial arch on serial urethrograms. Comments Differential diagnoses for dysuria in sexually intact male dogs include obstructive uroliths, urethral or bladder neoplasia, perineal or body wall hernia with bladder entrapment, prostatic disease

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

: surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Several surgical options have been proposed for the treatment of prostatic neoplasia, and results have shown mixed success. 2 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 In humans with localized prostatic disease, radiotherapy is a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association