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-making. Identifying prognostic indicators can lead to more informed decision-making, thereby optimizing patient management, improving clinical outcomes, and preventing undue suffering in cases where the prognosis is grave. 2 Previous studies have been performed to

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

for meat) is lacking. To the authors’ knowledge, risk factors and prognostic indicators for survival have not been previously reported for this population of animals. The objective of the retrospective study reported here was to describe the signalment

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

useful as a diagnostic or prognostic indicator for horses with signs of acute abdominal pain. Additionally, an abnormally increased haptoglobin concentration was not associated with the development of complications. Haptoglobin does not begin to increase

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

duration. Additionally, thrombocytopenia 12 , 16 and leukocytosis are common findings. 11 To date, no reliable prognostic indicators readily available at presentation have been identified for dogs with splenic HSA treated with surgery and chemotherapy. 17

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

risk factors, treatment, and prognostic indicators for the disease in these dogs. These 3 breeds were selected on the basis of investigations by Packer et al, 10 which indicated that Pugs, Bulldogs, and French Bulldogs were the breeds at greatest risk

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

a large scale. 5,8,13–16 The purpose of the present study was to identify possible risk factors, clinical features, and prognostic indicators of urolithiasis and death related to urolithiasis in pet guinea pigs at an exotic animal specialty service

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of the potential prognostic variables of interest to facilitate determining which variables to include in preliminary regressions. Additionally, the Fisher exact test was used for univariable analysis with those same prognostic indicators but with

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

retrospective study presented here was to investigate whether SC concentration is a useful prognostic indicator for nonsurvival versus survival to hospital discharge in critically ill dogs. We hypothesized that SC concentrations would be higher in dogs that did

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

A prospective study evaluating preoperative prognostic indicators in 80 cattle with abomasal volvulus was done. Surgical correction of the abomasal volvulus was performed in all animals. After surgery, cattle were categorized into 3 groups: productive (acceptable milk production or appetite, n = 59), salvaged (poor milk production or appetite, n = 10), and nonsurvivors (n = 11). Mean values for study variables did not differ significantly between salvaged and nonsurvivor groups. Cattle in these 2 groups were combined to form a nonproductive group, which was compared with the productive group. Productive cattle had a significantly lower preoperative heart rate than nonproductive cattle, were less dehydrated, had lower serum alkaline phosphatase (alp) activity and serum creatinine concentration, more frequent rumen contractions, higher serum Na+ and Cl concentrations, and had been inappetent for a shorter period. Significant differences were not detected in blood pH, base excess, anion gap, pcv, and serum K+ concentrations between the 2 groups. Feces from nonproductive cattle tended to be reduced in volume and were significantly darker.

A number of preoperative prognostic indices were evaluated by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (+pv) of each variable and by using logistic regression. Positive predictive values were generally higher in identifying productive cattle than nonproductive cattle. High +pv for productive animals were observed for cattle with normal hydration status (+pv, 0.96), serum creatinine concentration ≤ 1.5 mg/dl (+pv, 0.91), serum alp activity ≤ 100 IU/L (+pv, 0.90), serum Cl concentration ≥ 95 mEq/L (+pv, 0.90), and heart rate ≤ 80 beats/min (+pv, 0.88). Positive predictive values for nonproductive animals exceeded 0.50 only in cattle with heart rates ≥ 120 (+pv, 0.67) or ≥ 100 beats/min (+pv, 0.56), serum alp activity > 100 IU/L (+pv, 0.55), or ≥ 6% dehydration (+pv, 0.52). Anion gap ≥ 30 mEq/L was a poor prognostic indicator (+pv, 0.33). Logistic regression was used to identify 4 variables (hydration status, heart rate, period of inappetence, and serum alp activity) that had good predictive value. Preoperative determination of heart rate, hydration status, and period of inappetence appears superior to routinely used laboratory tests in determining the prognosis of cattle with abomasal volvulus. The cause of the high serum alp activity in nonproductive cattle needs to be determined.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

prognostic indicator. One of the drawbacks for use of a population with various disease processes included the small number of horses with each specific condition. The peritonitis and colitis subgroups were large enough to allow us to analyze them separately

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research