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associated with corticosteroids, collagen catabolism negatively impacts tendons and ligaments, exacerbating arthropathy, 1 and prompts the need to explore alternative, ideally prednisone-sparing, immunomodulatory therapy. Leflunomide is a disease

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

effect of an immunosuppressive dosage of prednisone (approx 2 mg/kg/d), ASA at a low dosage (approx 0.5 mg/kg/d), and the combination of these 2 drugs on TEG variables in healthy dogs. Our hypotheses were that prednisone would cause samples evaluated by

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of cardiac biomarkers. 5 In dogs with allergic dermatitis, prednisone administration (1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) for 14 days caused no changes in blood glucose concentration or echocardiographic variables, but the treatment was associated with a clinically

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of prednisone or prednisolone remains the standard treatment for primary IMPA. 6 For affected dogs with refractory disease, azathioprine, leflunomide, cyclophosphamide, levamisole, or mycophenolate mofetil can be used in combination with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

,9,10,11,12,13,14,15 In the study reported here, the efficacy of neoadjuvant prednisone treatment in reducing tumor burden (as indicated by changes in MaxD and tumor volume) was investigated in 49 dogs with MCTs. A subset of 27 of those dogs was prospectively assigned, on

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Thromboelastography has revealed hypercoagulability in healthy dogs given prednisone. 1 , a In humans, an excess of endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoids increases the risk of thromboembolic disease. 2–4 This hypercoagulability may be

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-remission durations of 6 to 9 months having been reported. 2 In dogs in which multiagent protocols cannot be used, because of owner time or cost limitations, single-agent protocols have the potential to improve survival time, compared with treatment with prednisone

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

serum lipase activity increases in dogs after administration of glucocorticoids. Thus, it is important to know the effects of prednisone administration on serum cPLI concentration. Because of the multitude of dogs that receive prednisone in veterinary

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

treatment alone is poor, and adverse effects of chronic corticosteroid administration are common. 7,10 In 1 study, 10 survival time for dogs treated with prednisone alone was approximately 22 days. In another study, 7 median survival time was 41 days for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

prednisone or other glucocorticoids prior to initiating cytotoxic chemotherapy repeatedly has been reported to have a deleterious effect on remission rate and survival time. 6–8 The pathogenesis of this clinical phenomenon is not fully understood; however

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association