Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 24 items for :

  • "postoperative colic" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

postoperatively. Follow up on postoperative colic, if not seen in hospital, was made via phone consultation with the owner 24 hours after discharge. Statistical analysis Statistical analysis was performed with SAS version 9.4 (SAS Institute Inc), and

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

at any time during postoperative hospitalization. Postoperative diarrhea was defined as unformed (looser than cowpie) feces persisting for more than the first 24 hours after surgery. Postoperative colic was defined as signs of abdominal pain or colic

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

likelihood of postoperative colic and repeat celiotomy. a In 1 study, 2 20% of horses that had a jejunocecostomy had postoperative ileus, whereas no horse developed this complication after a jejunojejunostomy. 2 Long-term survival rate for horses that had

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

anesthesia in horses are relatively limited, and reported incidence varies widely. The most common complications in previous reports are postanesthetic myopathy and colic (or decreased fecal output), with a postoperative colic incidence rate of 45%. General

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the horse's sedation level. In an effort to decrease postoperative colic, no more than a total of 10 mg of butorphanol was administered. Topical anesthesia (0.2 mL of 0.5% proparacaine hydrochloride solution initially, followed by 0.2 mL every 25

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

variable “Postoperative colic and reflux” should instead be “Postoperative colic, reflux, or both.” In the study, no horse in the hand-sewn group had both complications together, but 2 had colic only and another 2 had reflux only. In the stapled group, 3

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

postoperative colic and combined postoperative colic and reflux than did horses in the hand-sewn group. See page 1060 Detection of Tritrichomonas foetus carrier bulls in an infected Nebraska herd Traditionally, control of Tritrichomonas foetus

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

undergoing ophthalmic versus non-ophthalmic procedures. Excluding diagnostic imaging procedures, there was a significant positive correlation between surgery time and recovery time. There was a significantly higher rate of postoperative colic following

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

treatment owing to the extent of compromised bowel and need for intestinal resection. Of the 25 horses with GLE that were recovered from surgery, 16 developed postoperative complications that included nasogastric reflux (n = 8), severe postoperative colic

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

surgery is reportedly 2.8% to 6%. 4,5,11,12 Increased duration of anesthesia has been associated with an increased risk of postoperative colic. 13–15 Preoperative food deprivation has also been suggested but not established as a risk factor for colic

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association