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, while radiographs of both stifles and tarsi revealed effusion and raised concern for immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA). The patient was discharged with instructions to stop carprofen in the instance of immune-mediated disease and recommendations for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Immune-mediated polyarthritis is a common arthritic condition in dogs. First reported in the 1970s, IMPA is characterized as an inflammatory arthropathy, responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, for which no infectious etiology has been determined

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Two young Akitas were examined because of manifestation of a juvenile-onset form of polyarthritis. A search of medical records at the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine found 6 more similarly affected Akitas. The clinical manifestations were marked by cyclic febrile illness and signs of profound joint-related pain. Two dogs had concurrent aseptic meningitis. The syndrome resembles juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in human beings, although it shares features with systemic lupus erythematosus. Pedigree analysis of affected Akitas supported a heritable component to the syndrome. Treatment with immunosuppressive drugs was effective in 2 dogs that achieved complete remission, and in 2 dogs that achieved only partial remission. Classification of this syndrome is difficult and may represent an “overlap” syndrome commonly described in human beings.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

,8–11 Immune-mediated polyarthritis typically results in nonerosive lesions; IMPA-associated erosive lesions and bone destruction are rare. The term canine rheumatoid arthritis has been used to describe erosive IMPA, 12,13 but the latter term will be used

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Immune-mediated polyarthritis is an important cause of lameness and fever in dogs. In 1 study, 1 20% of dogs with fever of unknown origin had polyarthritis. Middle-aged large-breed dogs may be overrepresented. 2 The pathogenesis of IMPA is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) is a noninfectious, inflammatory polyarthropathy associated with type III hypersensitivity. 1 – 3 Immunologic stimuli and subsequent immune response lead to immune complex deposition within

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical signs, laboratory findings, relationship to vaccination, and response to treatment for type I immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—39 dogs.

Procedure—Clinical records and radiographic reports from 3 university referral hospitals were reviewed. Clinical signs, laboratory and investigative findings, relationship to vaccination, and response to treatment were evaluated.

Results—Clinical signs and initial laboratory and clinical investigative findings were frequently abnormal but were nonspecific and not associated with likelihood of recovery. Time of vaccination was not associated with onset of disease. Chemotherapeutic immunosuppression resulted in complete cure in 56% of dogs. Continuous medication was required in 18% (7/39) of dogs, relapses were treated successfully in 13% (5/39) of dogs, and 15% (6/39) of dogs died or were euthanatized as a result of disease.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The possible involvement of vaccination in type I IMPA was not made clear from this study because of the small population size. Signalment, clinical signs, and results of diagnostic tests other than multiple synovial fluid analyses were generally nonspecific. Most dogs with type I IMPA responded to initial immunosuppressive treatment, but 31% (12/39) of dogs relapsed, required further treatment, or both. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1323–1327)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

no abnormal findings (eg, joint erosion) indicative of rheumatoid arthritis. On the basis of findings, a splenic mass, polyarthritis, and nonregenerative anemia were diagnosed in the dog. To further investigate potential underlying causes, we

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association