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pressure (NIBP) measurement methods, such as doppler ultrasound (DOP) and pulse oximeter plethysmography (POP), may be used as alternatives to IBP measurement. Systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) measurements from the forelimb and hindlimb using DOP in

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To assess the validity of barometric whole-body plethysmography (BWBP) as a means of monitoring airway responses to induced bronchoconstriction in healthy cats.

Animals

8 healthy cats without history of bronchopulmonary disease or exposure to indoor tobacco smoke.

Procedure

Cats were placed into a barometric plethysmograph with an internal volume of 38 L, and air flow was recorded at baseline and after carbachol (concentrations 0.005, 0.01, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2%) was introduced into the chamber. A dose-response curve was generated for several flow-derived measurements, and airway reactivity was determined by interpolation of the dose-response curve for enhanced pause.

Results

Peak inspiratory and expiratory flows increased significantly, but respiratory rate, inspiratory and expiratory times, relaxation time, and tidal volume did not differ significantly from baseline values. Flow-derived measurements (pause, enhanced pause, and end-expiratory pause) increased significantly at carbachol concentrations > 0.02%. Baseline measurements did not correlate with indices of airway reactivity.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Airway reactivity can be measured by use of BWBP, which is non-invasive. Airway reactivity was highly variable among cats and was not a function of baseline airway caliber, suggesting that other intrinsic mechanisms may be important. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1487–1492)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of a modified whole body plethysmograph in awake sheep.

Animals—10 healthy adult sheep.

Procedure—Concurrent measurements of specific airway resistance (sRaw) and pulmonary resistance (RL) were obtained using a novel noninvasive headout constant-volume plethysmograph and esophageal balloon-pneumotachography, respectively. All data were collected before and after external resistive loading with 1 and 5.6 cm H20/L/s. Functional residual capacity (FRC) was measured by helium dilution for computation of airway resistance (Raw) preloading (Raw = sRaw/FRC).

Results—The sRaw and RL were closely correlated in 10 adult sheep. Additionally, sRaw and RL accurately reflected the magnitude of added resistance. The mean FRC was 52 mL/kg and used to calculate Raw. At baseline, the values for Raw were significantly correlated with sRaw and RL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Precise measurements of sRaw and Raw at baseline and sRaw after external resistive loading were obtained by use of this novel noninvasive plethysmographic technology. This method should have application to veterinary patients or animals used in research in which noninvasive rapid or serial measurements of sRaw in the conscious state are required. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1259–1264)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

changes during the onset of RAO, a noninvasive method is needed that can be used to continually monitor breathing patterns. Respiratory inductance plethysmography provides such a tool. Respiratory inductance plethysmography is noninvasive, does not

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

evaluate the effects of dexmedetomidine alone, doxapram alone, and the 2 drugs in combination on changes in breathing. Respiratory function was measured in snakes (n = 11) through unrestrained, whole-body, closed-chamber plethysmography in a room maintained

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

function tests —Pulmonary function was measured by use of head-out whole-body plethysmography as previously described. 16,17 The technique of head-out whole-body plethysmography required the dog to sit in a whole-body plethysmograph with its head and

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

inductive plethysmography has been used to describe the breathing patterns of horses at rest 15 and during exercise, 16 foals with evoked obstructions of the proximal and distal portions of the airways, 17 healthy llamas, 6 and a llama with diaphragmatic

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

treatment was administered. Airway reactivity testing —Flowmetric plethysmography d with histamine bronchoprovocation was used to assess pulmonary function and airway reactivity, as described elsewhere. 24,25 Horses were lightly sedated with xylazine

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

camelids. For example, R L and C dyn are used to describe the level of airway obstruction in horses with recurrent airway obstruction, 2 and head-out plethysmography has similar application in conscious dogs. 3 In horses with exercise intolerance and

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

into syringes by another person, and the syringes were partially wrapped with tape, so that the investigator performing the injections was blinded to differences in injection volume. Respiratory plethysmography Because of difficulties associated

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association