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(outward) bowing of the scapula on physical examination, widening of the scapular spine with an irregular surface contour on scapular palpation and ultrasonography, and mixed lytic and productive lesions on cervical radiographs have been described in horses

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Records were reviewed retrospectively, and patient signalment, history, physical examination findings; results of serum biochemical analyses, coagulation tests (PT and aPTT), and an amanitin test; treatments; and outcomes were recorded. The following

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

variation among individual animals and to increase power. All equids were deemed healthy on the basis of results of a physical examination, CBC, serum biochemical analysis, and complete ophthalmic examination, including slit-lamp biomicroscopy, direct and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction The physical examination of a dog presenting to a veterinary hospital is considered a major diagnostic tool that can not only provide insight into the ailments or wellness of a dog, but also establishes a direction for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the reliability of history and physical examination findings for assessing control of glycemia in insulin-treated diabetic dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—53 insulin-treated dogs with diabetes mellitus.

Procedure—Medical records of insulin-treated diabetic dogs from June 1995 to June 1998 were reviewed, and information on owner perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings, body weight, insulin dosage, and concentrations of food-withheld (ie, fasting) blood glucose (FBG), mean blood glucose (MBG) during an 8-hour period, blood glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), and serum fructosamine was obtained. Owner's perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight were used to classify control of glycemia as good or poor for each dog. The FBG, MBG/8 h, blood GHb, and serum fructosamine concentrations were compared between well-controlled and poorly controlled insulin-treated diabetic dogs.

Results—Presence or absence of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, lethargy, and weakness were most helpful in classifying control of glycemia. Mean FBG and MBG/8 h concentrations, blood GHb concentrations, and serum fructosamine concentrations were significantly decreased in 25 well-controlled diabetic dogs, compared with 28 poorly controlled diabetic dogs. Most well-controlled diabetic dogs had concentrations of FBG between 100 and 300 mg/dl, MBG/8 h ≤ 250 mg/dl, blood GHb ≤ 7.5%, and serum fructosamine ≤ 525 µmol/L, whereas most poorly controlled diabetic dogs had results that were greater than these values.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Reliance on history, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight are effective for initially assessing control of glycemia in insulin-treated diabetic dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:48–53)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine whether physical examination, laboratory, or radiographic abnormalities in foals with Rhodococcus equi infection were associated with survival, ability to race at least once after recovery, or, for foals that survived and went on to race, subsequent racing performance.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

49 Thoroughbreds and 66 Standardbreds admitted to 1 of 6 veterinary teaching hospitals between 1984 and 1992 in which R equi infection was positively diagnosed.

Procedure

Results of physical examination, laboratory testing, and thoracic radiography were reviewed. Indices of racing performance were obtained for foals that recovered and eventually raced and compared with values for the US racing population.

Results

83 (72%) foals survived. Foals that did not survive were more likely to have extreme tachycardia (heart rate > 100 beats/min), be in respiratory distress, and have severe radiographic abnormalities on thoracic radiographs at the time of initial examination than were foals that survived. Clinicopathologic abnormalities were not associated with whether foals did or did not survive. Forty-five of the 83 surviving foals (54%) eventually raced at least once, but none of the factors examined was associated with whether foals went on to race. Racing performance of foals that raced as adults was not significantly different from that of the US racing population.

Clinical Implications

R equi infection in foals is associated with a decreased chance of racing as an adult; however, foals that eventually go on to race perform comparably to the US racing population. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:510-515)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The intention of this tutorial video is to illustrate the methods of examining the forelimb and neck of a horse in order to identify abnormalities that may be associated with lameness or disease.

ANIMAL

A 16-year-old quarter horse gelding was used for examination.

METHODS

The horse was examined for abnormalities by means of physical examination.

RESULTS

The examination of the forelimb and neck of the horse was successfully completed.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

This examination technique is required to identify abnormalities in the equine forelimb and can be utilized during a lameness examination.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Body temperature of the horse is routinely assessed by measurement of rectal temperature during physical examination. The normal reference range of rectal temperature in horses has been well established and is 37.5 to 38.3 °C. 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

physical examinations and diagnostic tests, which may mislead the treatment plan of the patient. 6 – 12 In addition, the stressed animal may react aggressively during the examination and treatment, which is also a major concern to companion animal owners

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

study reported here were to determine signalment, history, and outcome of cats with gastrointestinal tract intussusception and to identify physical examination, diagnostic imaging, surgical, histologic, and necropsy findings in affected cats

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association